vonbrand
  • Member for 6 years, 4 months
  • Last seen more than a month ago
  • Valparaíso, Chile
How do you work with open core code efficiently in Git?
23 votes

Most version control systems (like git) don't allow to split the repository into "visible" and "invisible" parts. What you can do with git is to have the public part in one ...

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How to contribute to Open Source as a non-programmer?
22 votes

You might want to check out e.g. Fedora's page on how and for what to join. You'll see plenty of tasks for non-programmers. Some of the highly regarded members of the Fedora community don't do any ...

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Open Source license for school use, but not commercial use
10 votes

The Open Source definition includes (point 5) "No Discrimination Against Persons or Groups" and (point 6) "No Discrimination Against Fields of Endeavor", so such a license wouldn't be open source. The ...

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Can you purchase the right to distribute GPLv3 code without disclosing source code?
Accepted answer
9 votes

If I write some program from scratch, I can choose to license as open source under e.g. GPLv3, and simultaneously license it for a stiff fee for use in closed source applications, no GPL strings ...

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Own LGPL code in proprietorial project
9 votes

Your code is your own, you can use it in closed products while giving away copies under e.g. LGPL. Just be clear that if I take your code and modify it under LGPL (e.g. to fix bugs) you are not ...

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Pacifist copyleft-like partially-open-source license
9 votes

Such a license would definitely not be open source (6: No discrimination against fields of endeavor) nor approved by the FSF (Freedom 0: The freedom to run the program as you wish, for any purpose). ...

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What to do when proprietary code is found in your open source project?
9 votes

Sadly, there is little you can do. I believe you can argue that you accepted the code in good faith, and avoid the worst. Try to collect and organize any evidence of the affair (emails, commit ...

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Did Google accidentally release Product Sans/Google Sans font in Apache License?
Accepted answer
8 votes

One has to assume they did so on purpose. In any case, if they did so on purpose or not is not your concern: You did get the font legally under the stated license, and enjoy the benefits laid out ...

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Can I create and use my own license or do I need to publish it somewhere?
8 votes

Do not create your own license. It will probably miss many of the legal subtleties, and end up either allowing much more than you want or much less. It will be incompatible with other licenses, ...

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Finding low hanging fruit on open source code
Accepted answer
7 votes

What are you interested in? Working on e.g. the Linux kernel if your interest lies in user interfaces won't cut it. Preferably something you use day to day, so you have a feel of the problems, and are ...

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How can I contribute source code to the NTP project?
6 votes

The internal dynamics of a project are their own business. I've seen some that only publish stable versions on github (or such), others that are just distributed as tarballs (and you can send patches ...

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Can I use GPL libraries in a closed source project if only the output is distributed?
6 votes

Be careful. Some uses of a program or library include parts of it in the result. Quite unlikely for a library, but a tool like e.g.bison writes a program that contains pieces of the source. In fact, ...

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Source code distribution without commercial use
6 votes

The Open Source Definition and also the Free Software Foundation specifically insist that no restrictions on use are allowed. The FSF even encourages making money off software, as long as the license ...

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Does the MIT open source licence cover making the key file, for a strongly typed assembly, public?
Accepted answer
6 votes

I'd add instructions for somebody else to cook up their own key, and sign (and verify) with that. Also publish somewhere you have total control the key to check the signature. The signing key should ...

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If a project is forked and its license is changed, which license should be followed?
6 votes

Open source/free software licenses work by leveraging copyright. In a nutshell, the creator of a work (or whoever paid for the development) has the right to allow (or not) others to copy the work (...

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Choice of and conversion between licenses
Accepted answer
5 votes

As long as you don't distribute further, the license (permissions you give third parties) is quite irrelevant. If you want to publish it, then the license becomes relevant. And what license(s) you ...

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Can I dual license my code after accepting downstream contributions into my code base?
Accepted answer
5 votes

If you accepted contributions from third parties, their contributions belong to them and you can't change licensing terms on them. They might not even have made their contributions legally available ...

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When folks send me pull-requests on GitHub, what are their copyright/licensing terms by default?
5 votes

In case of doubt, you should state clearly that you only accept contributions under GPLv3 (or whatever license you select), and that the constributor must make sure they are allowed to contribute ...

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Maintaining a complex FOSS linux distribution
Accepted answer
5 votes

Building a distribution is a lot of work. Perhaps instead of trying to create a full distribution it is better to just maintain the package(s) for Debian or Ubuntu, or offering to help out if it is ...

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Can I distribute a BSD code with GPL v3 binaries?
Accepted answer
5 votes

You can not distribute anything linking against GPL code as anything other than GPL. At least, that is the FSF's position, there is no firm legal determination one way or the other. In case of doubt, ...

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Open Sourcing Commissioned Art
5 votes

If you are the legal owners of the copyright, you are certainly entitled to license it as you want, including making it open. But as images, you should probably look for the Creative Commons licenses.

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How can a "crayon" license be a problem?
5 votes

One particular problem is that your home-knit license is probably incompatible with everything else, and thus creates an island that is useless to everybody else, even if the intent is to be very free....

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Open Source Textbook Solutions
Accepted answer
5 votes

Problems in textbooks are often used in homework or exams. That is the most often cited reason. Besides, having the answers gives the lecturer a (not to be dismissed) advantage in front of the class. ...

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Proprietary software made of free software parts
5 votes

Completing CRDrost's answer, according to the FSF, just being able to link against a GPL library forces the whole to be GPL (there are dissenting opinions, and no firm legal precedents; for some GPL ...

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Can a GPL license be converted to Proprietary by the author later?
4 votes

Yes, the author (or whoever holds the copyright) can do as they please, changing the licence at will. But anyone who already received a copy under a free licence continues to enjoy the rights that ...

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Do you have to be mark the changes when modifying code under MIT, Apache2.0 or BSD?
Accepted answer
4 votes

You should add e.g. "(c) 2021 Joe R. User" to the file headers (where you find such comments) to mark that you've made some changes, and claim your rights to them formally. Check the ...

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Using one source code file from other project with different license type
4 votes

As per GPL, if you use GPL code in your project, the whole shebang must be under GPL. If that isn't acceptable, you'll have to find a way around that (find another one with a MIT-compatile license, ...

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Include copyright material used by permission in open source repository
Accepted answer
4 votes

If only you are allowed to use that extra material, keep it out of the repository. Say I (inadvertently, or on purpose, doesn't matter) grab that material, you could be liable for distributing it to ...

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If I create a derivative work of code that follows a protocol, am I still bound by its license?
4 votes

You could give somebody the format specification and ask to implement the functionality for parsing the file. That way you should be completely in the clear regarding this.

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Are CDDL and GPL really incompatible?
4 votes

I'd suspect they are really incompatible. For example, there is a lot of pressure on Linux (GPLv2) to include Sun's (now Oracle's) ZFS filesystem (CDDL license, from Solaris), as it is a more mature, ...

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