Bart van Ingen Schenau
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Can others monetize my project with GPLv3?
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51 votes

Yes, what is being done on that fork is entirely legal. However, you are also allowed to take the useful changes (like the translation) and incorporate them in your own fork. Then you can advertise ...

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Embedding GPL code in proprietary software
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34 votes

When your code contains (or links to) GPL licensed code, then the GPL license requires that you distribute your application under the GPL license. The GPL does not require that you distribute your ...

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Can I sell a proprietary software with an LGPL library bundled along with it, without making my source code public?
23 votes

Yes, you can distribute your software without making the source code public and without giving recipients the right to make changes to your software. The LGPL license explicitly allows such usages of ...

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Can I change the license of a forked project to the MIT if the license of the parent project has changed from the GPL to the MIT?
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20 votes

That depends. If you didn't make any changes in your fork of the project, you can just update your fork to include the latest upstream changes and get the license change along with it. If the ...

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Does the three-clause BSD license hinder academic citations?
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17 votes

No, the third clause of the BSD license does not prevent an academic citation of your work. What it prevents is statements along the lines of Because we have made use of tool X by @wimi, they ...

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What does "express grant of patent rights from contributors to users" mean?
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17 votes

There are two, completely independent, forms of intellectual property rights that can be used to protect software against unwanted copying/modification: Copyright Patents Copyright protects the "...

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What happens if very common code is released under GPL?
17 votes

Copyright protection only comes into play when an actual copy has been made of a work. If two people write a "hello world" program independently of each other, then both programs are protected by ...

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According to the GPL FAQ use within a company or organization is not considered distribution. What is the legal definition of a company/organization?
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15 votes

To answer the question in the title ("What is the legal definition of a company/organization?"), that depends on the laws in the concerned countries and may also depend on how the company is ...

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Difference between MongoDB SSPL and GNU AGPL
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15 votes

The AGPL requires that the people interacting with program A over a network have the right (and possibility) to obtain a copy of the source code of A. The AGPL does not strictly define what ...

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If a piece of software does not specify whether it is licenced under GPL 3.0 "only" or "or-later", which variant does it "default to"?
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15 votes

The GPLv3 license itself states on the topic of later versions: 14. Revised Versions of this License. [...] Each version is given a distinguishing version number. If the Program specifies that a ...

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Can someone re-license my BSD-3-licensed project under the MIT license, remove my copyright notices, and list me as a "collaborator" without consent
15 votes

The BSD-3 license is a permissive license, but even permissive licenses have restrictions that must be observed. By removing your copyrights and license, the person who copied your code has violated ...

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Is the output of an open source program licensed the same?
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15 votes

In general, the license of the software used to create a file doesn't have any influence on the possible licenses you can distribute that file under. For example, if you use Microsoft Word to write ...

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What do I need to share if I include CC-BY-SA artwork in my software?
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15 votes

In the large majority of cases, the software of a program and the artwork used by a program are not related to each other where copyright is concerned. An exception might be an image that was created ...

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Open-source license (probably not FLOSS) that allows "use in a commercial context" but disallow "to sell the software or modified versions"?
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14 votes

There are no open-source licenses that forbid selling copies of the software, because that kind of restriction is not allowed in a license that is recognized as an open-source license by the community/...

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Can I modify an open source license to require that I be notified?
13 votes

Adding a requirement to notify you when a fork is being made renders a license non-free. The reasoning behind this is that the requirement discriminates against people that, for whatever reason, are ...

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Reusing test input files from GPLv2 project for automated testing
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12 votes

As I understand it, you choose these files because they they contain the characteristics you want to test against and they are conveniently already available. But otherwise, you could use any file at ...

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Patent rights: BSD-3-Clause-Clear vs BSD-3-Clause
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12 votes

Your understanding is incorrect. Patents are intellectual property rights that exist to protect an invention. They are distinct from copyrights, which protect the expression of an idea. Inventions ...

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Pros and Cons of using MPL-2.0 license?
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11 votes

Am I allowed to distribute the project for money under this license? Yes. However, if you distribute/sell binaries, then you may not charge extra for the source code. And, as the MPL license is a ...

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What happens if I stop using a GPL library?
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11 votes

This depends on who you accepted contributions from while the code is under the GPL license. If you didn't accept contributions from others and you are the sole copyright holder, then you can change ...

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Can someone else copyright for themselves already copyrighted things?
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9 votes

all his app is copyrighted This statement is almost certainly true, in the sense that probably all the code is covered by copyright protection and that one or multiple persons or companies hold those ...

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Doesn't GPL with CLA defeat the point?
9 votes

(a) if I am correct about GPL's original "motivation" No you are not correct about the motivation for creating the GPL. To quote Richard Stallman, the father of the GPL license: My work on ...

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Did Google accidentally release Product Sans/Google Sans font in Apache License?
9 votes

The LICENSE file in the repository contains the text of two licenses (the Apache 2.0 and the CC-BY-NC-SA 4.0) and between those is a very important paragraph All image and audio files (including *....

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Copyright notice in the file header (Apache v2 license)
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9 votes

SmartBear Software only has a copyright claim on files that were copied from the Swagger repository. --And even there, I see some problems. More on that later.-- The copyright on any files that are ...

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An open-source code license: zero-cost for open-source only
9 votes

Disallowing commercial use is a restriction that open-source licenses are not allowed to have. Any license that doesn't allow you to use the software for commercial purposes is not considered to be an ...

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Am I allowed to make use of parts of the codebase of a library that is licensed under LGPL (v2.1)
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9 votes

The license terms of the LGPL license effectively distinguish two different models: You make changes to the LGPL code, or you copy portions of the LGPL licensed code into your own project. In this ...

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If I use MIT, and I like authors to keep copyright of their patches, does MIT forbid this and do I need them to relicense back their contributions?
Accepted answer
8 votes

Copyright transfer and licensing are two very different things. In a copyright transfer, you literally transfer the rights on what you have written to another person or organization. You literally ...

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Can I create a translation for a project under a Creative Commons non-commercial non-derivative?
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8 votes

The question is, can anyone fork my repo and translate it into a different language under the Creative Commons License Non-commercial Non-derivative that I have? No. I believe that the copyright laws ...

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What is the standard practice when the developer does not want third party redistribution of a certain free and open source software?
8 votes

One way to deal with such a request is to treat is as a "please respect my trademark" request. You create a fork of the complete project, give it a new name and you make it clear that you ...

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Open source license for limited use
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8 votes

There are no open-source licenses that have such a "no commercial use" restriction, as such restrictions are limitations on the freedoms that open-source wants to give. A fairly common business model ...

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Seeking Creative-Commons-like license with addition(s) to request or require modifications be contributed back to source
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8 votes

Requiring people to contribute their changes back to the original project is a bit of a problem point for licenses. For open-source license, such a requirement fails the "desert island test" and ...

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