71

First of all, these two statements are made in sequence, not parallel (credit to MSalters for crystallizing this point): Generally speaking, the absence of a license means that the default copyright laws apply. ...if you publish your source code in a public repository on GitHub... you allow others to view and fork your repository. The first statement is a ...


15

Well, you actually give up a few rights by accepting the terms of service. The terms of service declare: However, by setting your pages to be viewed publicly, you agree to allow others to view your Content. By setting your repositories to be viewed publicly, you agree to allow others to view and fork your repositories. So effectively you don't have ...


13

The two fragments you've highlighted contradict each other. The real question is: What will the courts make out of this, if a fork happens, and the original author decides to sue? I am not going to predict the outcome of such a conflict. The court may decide the law is superior to the click-wrap of GitHub's TOS, or vice versa. Nobody will know the answer ...


11

Does this sentence just summarize what the consequences are of licensing (to SE) my content under CC BY-SA 3.0? Or does this sentence state that I’m licensing (to SE) my content under a second license? It does not just summarize the CC-BY-SA license. You are indeed dual licensing your content to Stack Exchange. By posting to a Stack Exchange site, ...


4

It seems obvious that this was intended to protect Github itself from claims of copyright infringement arising from the creation of forks. It wasn't meant for the benefit of Github users, so it's not surprising that it's of little practical use. You can create a fork, but without a license, you still can't do anything with the fork.


4

If you were to post a GPL work on some service such as Facebook, the difficulty arises that we may only convey this work under the terms of the GPL. In particular, GPLv3 section 4 says: You may convey verbatim copies of the Program's source code as you receive it, in any medium, provided that you [state the license, keep intact all licenses, notices, and ...


3

TL/DR: The Amazon AppStore is compatible with GPL software, as long as it stays away from the DRM features. The terms of the Amazon AppStore, which can be found here, include some restrictions that would be incompatible with the GPL or other copyleft licenses, but most of those restrictions can be waived by the publisher of an App. 3.3 Separate Licenses ...


2

The way that StackExchange does it is a simple statement that you have read and agree with the Terms of Service when registering for an account. Some sites use a slightly stronger indication by requiring you to check a check-box to indicate you agree with the ToS. This is all very standard for sites that allow the creation of accounts. In the Terms of ...


2

There is a free version of Highcharts, but it primarily pertains to personal (non-commercial) use. The most obvious answer to your first question is: because it's the law. Highcharts licenses their software for certain entities to use, so without obtaining the necessary license, you would be in violation of the applicable law. (I'm not a lawyer, so don't ...


2

(This answer is based on US law; your legal system may differ.) You acknowledge and agree that Postman (...) have and retain all legal right (...) in the Services including but not limited to any ideas, concepts, inventions, systems, platforms, interfaces, tools, utilities, user interface, algorithms, logic, formula, scripts, work flows, processes, software,...


1

This is the widely-used Apache License 2.0, which allows you to redistribute the work, whether modified or unmodified, for any purpose, as long as you preserve the original author's copyright notices. One existing Q&A on complying with this license is Requirements for using an Apache-licensed library


1

For nearly all issues of work done under contract, as we've already said, the details depend entirely on what's in the contract. In terms of normal behaviour, the answers to your questions are yes, up to you, yes, no, no (but the owner won't be you). The usual path, unless you hold out for a contract that specifies otherwise, is that you're being paid to ...


1

I am not a lawyer... Depending on which license you use, there may be provided examples. For instance, the folks at gnu.org have a "How to use this license" type document https://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-howto.en.html And it includes the following as suggested in order to use GPLv3-or-later - This program is free software: you can redistribute it and/...


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