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Yes, it is open source. It is not free, but it IS open source. Such distinctions have been noted for decades. Just because OSI says one thing has NO bearing on the literal meaning. Some people here claim the "popular" definition of open source is not met by the condition you specify, but such people are willfully deciding what SUB-population ...


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I'm not sure this question is going to survive the community much longer, but I personally think it contains a genuine question that admits of an answer. PHP8 isn't in any major distro yet (that I'm aware of). I see that some custom build repositories like Remi's Repo have it available, but it's not the default version even for users of those repos; it'll ...


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In my opinion, if the source code is available but can only be legally used for testing or auditing purposes then yes it is open source, but it is NOT free software. This is basically the position that the Free Software Foundation has promoted ever since the term "open source" was coined. Their essay on the topic might be a little dated because ...


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Can PGP be considered open source software? No. It is a commercial proprietary licensed software. Even PGP Corporation doesn't claim it is open source software. On the other hand GNU Privacy Guard (abbreviated GnuPG or GPG) which could be described as the FSF's implementation of the OpenPGP specification is definitely open source and has a GPLv3 license.


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No, of course it is NOT open-source. The generally-accepted definition of open-source is the one by the OSI. The list on the linked site of the OSI is a bit more verbose and fleshed-out, but the important part is: For a software to be allowed to be called open-source it needs some form of (ideally OSI-approved) license which grants the users right to use the ...


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Reading code and then writing it down from memory, whenever you're writing down the exact code or not, can be considered "derived work" and thus could be subject to copyright (IANAL, but as far as I can recall the definitions of derived work and fair use remain fuzzy and subject to interpretation; in this specific case, and particularly if the ...


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