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1

I see several issues here. Firstly, there is no bar on using GPL software for commercial purposes. You can sell it; you must simply honour the GPL when you do so, which means giving your customers access to source, on the GPL's terms. So I think when you say commercial you mean proprietary, ie, without giving your customers access to the source of your ...


2

As I understand it, no, it's not. The clue is in the name: it's a runtime library exception (RTLE) not a compile-time exception. If you statically link your binary with GPLv3-plus-RTLE-covered libraries, not only will you be distributing GPLv3-covered code (the library's object files), but you will also have created a work which in many people's eyes is a ...


1

It looks like to me as if html2canvas contains code from Microsoft's TypeScript project. I don't know if the inclusion was manual or via an automatic tool, but it makes html2canvas a derivative of TypeScript, in copyright terms. TypeScript is licensed under Apache2. This requires that any derivative work include the Apache licence text (s4a) and the ...


3

One point that you are missing is that "trivial" things do not create a copyright of their own; nobody gets a copyright on VLOOKUP() as a whole just by using it in a YouTube video. The rest of your examples you're pretty much correct on - some of them you can use under CC-BY SA (which as you note is a problem for code) or you have to reimplement ...


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