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2

There are ways around this, depending on the version of the GPL. Earlier versions of the GPL made it possible to build the code into a standalone executable or a DLL which could be dynamically linked. With a suitable license you could legitimately fork the software, maintaining its GPL license, and being careful with how you call/execute that code. You would ...


58

The GPL, and software licensing in general, must be understood in the wider context of copyright. Only the copyright holder of a software can issue a license. You have no rights to the software, except through the license (and except for copyright exceptions in your jurisdiction). The GPL does not give you the right to re-publish the software under any ...


14

Copyright does not allow for that. You need to wait 70 years after the copyright holders' deaths to do this. In that respect it is no different from a closed source license: If you want to change the license, you need permission. Back around 2000 Larry Lessig had a lecture where he explained there are may works, where we cannot contact the author (https://en....


2

The question, as stated, is: Can the Linux kernel be released under GPLv3? Yes, of course. If all the copyright holders involved agree to release the kernel under GPLv3, or any other licence, then they can do so. But the real question seems to be: Can the Linux kernel be used under GPLv3? As the question stated, Wikipedia says “no”. So what about that ...


5

Version 4 of CC BY-NC license explicitly says the user cannot share adapted material for Commercial purpose: Section 2.a. License grant. Subject to the terms and conditions of this Public License, the Licensor hereby grants You a worldwide, royalty-free, non-sublicensable, non-exclusive, irrevocable license to exercise the Licensed Rights in the Licensed ...


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