New answers tagged

2

I'm going to take a contrary position to some of the other answers here. To be clear: You have the legal right to make a PPA, with or without the developer's permission. But it might not be a good idea, based on what you have told us in your question. Packaging and distribution is not easy to do. At an absolute minimum, you will be responsible for all of the ...


0

If it's purely open-source software "the developer" has no rights. If "the developer" has built upon free or open-source software, the builder/developer has rights to what was built/developed but nothing else.


0

This is a great question because it comes up a lot and might seem like a bit of a free for all, but there are ways to be a bit objective in answering! I will try to do this by sharing with you approaches that I have seen to be successful, and basing what I say on documentation and policy where it exists. I don't know that there is a "standard" ...


4

One way to deal with such a request is to treat is as a "please respect my trademark" request. You create a fork of the complete project, give it a new name and you make it clear that you are the maintainer of this fork and not the person maintaining the original project. After having done that, you can take your fork in any direction you (and the ...


11

This seems to happen again and again. Someone develops software, generously distributing it as free software, but doesn't fully understand the implications of giving their users the four freedoms. There was a piece of free software that gathered data from various sleep apnea machines, the principal developer of which parted company with the entire community ...


7

There probably is no generally accepted way to handle a situation like you describe; the best answer and course of action always depends on the individual case. On the one hand it's good to have a package available as easily as possible - but as a maintainer it's very much desirable to have them on a reliable basis which will last some time and create the ...


3

I do not know why the author of the SO answer writes as sie does. Having stated that you can't redistribute only parts of OpenJDK, sie then summarises the GPL as saying that you may "modify the program’s source code and distribute the modified source", which explicitly permits you to redistribute only parts of OpenJDK. Yes, you may strip out of ...


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