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Is 0BSD actually a valid license for work in the public domain? Technically not, because you are trying to give a copyright license on something that isn't protected by copyright law. Would it cause problems in some jurisdictions? I am no lawyer, but I can see it causing issues in the US if someone takes issue with the fact that a public-domain work ...


3

Public domain (PD) indicates a copyright status, for example that copyright has expired or was relinquished by the copyright holder. While this provides for maximum permissiveness, giving up copyright is not recognized in some jurisdictions. For example, I live in Germany and would not be able to contribute to a Public Domain “licensed” project. Public ...


2

You can write whatever you want, as long as you respect the licences of any external pieces you include/use. On the other hand, you want any user of your code to be able to find out easily, and without any ambiguities, what is going on. It isn't that much of a hassle to add a README file (or a section thereof) spelling out what license(s) apply to which ...


1

The "Unlicense" and/or public domain are not valid in some jurisdictions (in much of Europe you aren't allowed to give away all rights). If you look at the BSD licenses (and others), you'll see that they explicitly disclaim warranties, limiting liabilities for the donor. It is no fun to write code, donate it to the world, it gets used by somebody ...


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