New answers tagged

0

Yes, it is possible to make an open source project into a closed source project. The copyright holder can change the license of a project at any time, or cease to distribute source code of new releases. New releases can therefore be made closed source. Neither of these actions affect previous releases of the project which were distributed under open source ...


2

That's a tricky question and a good question - and I'm not sure there is one solution which will work under all circumstances. I can share a (probably legally-not-too-sound) procedure for similar cases which I see in my environment being employed. In scientific context consider someone wrote a programme which allows to simulate to allow to gain insight in ...


0

And since we can't copyright the output of a program, I wonder if this would essentially nullify the CC-BY protection of our data, since people could just download our R scripts, generate the data for themselves, and call it their own. I am not sure of the claim "we can't copyright the output of a program" Have you asked your lawyer about that claim? I am ...


4

There is a concept called database right. I am not sure whether this would apply in your case though - the idea behind database rights is to protect investment in creating the database, but if a user of your program creates the database by running it, you haven't invested anything into creating the database itself (for example, the user running the program ...


0

How to completely get rid of proprietary code in the library? I am not a lawyer, but you could consider providing some plugin machinery in your library. In some legal systems, a plugin machinery might be a technical solution to your problem. who owns the copyright of your code (and how many millions of US$ or € are available to the copyright owner)? In ...


3

how can I release it so that the company can not claim that I was redistributing their proprietary info? This depends on what you mean by "proprietary info". If the company had a document that described a network protocol, that document could be considered "proprietary information" by the company. Any derived documents (such as format conversions or ...


5

I would question your assertion that you cannot use the information in your library. Copyright is about the expression of an idea, not the idea itself. So long as somewhere along the line, you have a clean break from the original implementation - for example, if you coded your implementation solely from one of the descriptions of the data structures, rather ...


Top 50 recent answers are included