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49

If your plugin is a derivative work of the GPL-covered software, then you can only publish/share/distribute your plugin under the terms of the GPL. It is not clear when a plugin is a derivative work. It seems to be the belief of the FSF (the GPL authors) that the following aspects can indicate derivativeness: the plugin is designed to be combined with a ...


5

The wording "should" is a dead giveaway. The FSF would generally like you (and everybody else) to comply with their ideology but they have no real means of forcing you, in general. That's not necessarily a bad thing because although it's a bit quixotic, the FSF ideology isn't bad. In general, you are legally bound to comply with all terms that anyone (not ...


5

If I use a compiled program [...] which is under a license that everyone has the rights to use and sell (Eg: GPL) [...] and then I want to develop an extended feature for it [...] to be sold for money, to be available only to the person that paid for this premium feature - Must I release this premium feature also as GPL? If your work is a derivative of the ...


4

Let's say I develop a plugin for third-party application X. My plugin has a non-free license, and is commercially distributed. I don't distribute application X. Okay. That would require that your plugin not be a derivative work of any work covered by the GPL. That means that it cannot contain sufficient protectable expression from the work that is covered ...


3

Most of these questions have not been decided in the courts, and it's anyone's guess how they would be decided if the question came up. A lawyer's guess might be better than yours, or it might not; the language in the FSF licenses is so vague technically that I certainly wouldn't want to hazard a guess myself. So it comes down to what risks you are ...


3

You cannot use the GNU GPL in a plugin for a non-GPL program. However, you can use the GNU LGPL license.


2

According to the GPL FAQ: I would like to bundle GPLed software with some sort of installation software. Does that installer need to have a GPL-compatible license? (#GPLCompatInstaller) No. The installer and the files it installs are separate works. As a result, the terms of the GPL do not apply to the installation software.


2

The GPL and AGPL permit commercial use, as do all licenses approved by the Free Software Foundation and the Open Source Initiative. If you want to prohibit commercial use or distribution, you will need to look outside the FLOSS community for licensing terms. Since you mentioned Fancybox, I should note that the author of that software has made significant ...


2

Judging by your last paragraph, the backend plugins are loaded as libraries into the application that contains your library. The GPL license considers that the application and all involved libraries are a single work and that the GPL terms and conditions must apply to every part of that work. As a consequence, if you distribute your library build with/...


1

Can I distribute an installer script which installs X, P and Q on the user's computer when they run it? I have the feeling that you are treading on thin ice here and you should definitely consult a lawyer with experience in open-source licensing before betting a company on it. Your safest option is to distribute X without any plugins and let the user ...


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