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6

A patent is a temporary legal monopoly on an invention, which grants to the holder the legal right to exclude others from making, using, selling, offering for sale, and/or importing that invention (source) or anything which embodies it. In most countries, the concept of "invention" now unfortunately includes ideas expressed in software. How can I get in ...


6

To answer the principal question in the body: yes, this would violate any such applicable patents. A patent provides the legal right to "exclude others from making, using, selling, offering for sale, or importing the patented invention for the term of the patent". Note that although some of those activities are implicitly commercial, others are not; making ...


4

As I understand it, if I implement the algorithm myself, then I could license that code under the GPL, but someone else could potentially re-implement the entire algorithm from scratch (for example, in a different programming language, but using the same core steps), and their implementation wouldn't necessarily have to be GPL-licensed. Basically, and IANAL/...


4

There is the case of Versata v. Ameriprise and then XimpleWare v. Versata and Ameriprise, over some GPLv2-licensed XML parsing utility : https://opensource.com/law/14/7/lawsuit-threatens-break-new-ground-gpl-and-software-licensing-issues


4

Patents are a national affair and each country's patent office can only grant patents that apply to that country's territories. Within the EU, the patent laws have been harmonized to a large extent and the EU patent office has been granted some powers to act on behalf of each member country's patent office. Similar agreements may exists in other parts of the ...


3

Any source which makes use of GPL-licensed code needs to follow the license when you distribute it or it's binaries. That means the GPL applies to the complete work and you will obliged to provide source code. In your example all three, 3rdPartyRepo, CustomRepo1 and CustomRepo2 cannot be shared without either changing licenses to GPL (and sharing complete ...


3

Anything that links against GPL has to be distributed under GPL. If you never distribute, no problem.


2

What I want is to publish the library without having to live in the terror to be prosecuted by USA justice. I am not living in USA, and I have a European nationality. I would contact European open source organizations (like APRIL and AFUL - I am personally member of both) and perhaps the embassy (scientific advisor) of your country in the USA. See also the ...


1

A patent gives an inventor the exclusive right to use the ideas covered by the patent. This means that nobody is allowed to create a product incorporating those ideas without permission from the patent holder. This exclusive right is time limited and when a patent has expired then the time period for which those exclusive rights were given has ended. This ...


1

The last question is the easiest. You apply a licence to it because if you don't, the software is unusable. Nobody else will have the right to run, copy, modify, or redistribute it, so nobody will. As to why you'd put your name on it, I agree that in theory some patent troll could sue you. The thing is, patent trolls exist to make money via lawsuits. It'...


1

One directly infringes a patent by making, selling, offering for sale, importing or using it. An open source foundation generally does not do these things. But it likely does encourage others to make, use, etc. technology that it essentially distributes. That can be an indirect infringement classed as contributory infringement or active inducement of ...


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