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6

Debian packages often combine multiple projects into one package. The copyright file typically contains very accurate descriptions of which parts are available under what license. The copyright file will usually contain glob patterns that match specific files to some license. The result is that yes, the libprotobuf-dev package in its entirety does contain ...


3

Ultimately, your project relies on functionality supplied by some package X. It doesn't matter if your code relies on it directly or if it relies on package Y which in turn relies on package X - the bottom line is that without package X, your project wouldn't work. In short - you need to acknowledge all the packages you're using, whether directly or ...


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As I understand it, since your software contains code taken directly from R, albeit then modified, your software is, in copyright terms, a derivative work of R. [Is] my Bioconductor package ... allowed to contain this slightly modified C code of the R function Yes, it is. The point of the GPL is to allow code reuse in this manner. should I place the ...


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In simple terms, the requirements of the LGPL license are that an end-user has the possibility to replace the LGPL licensed code with a different version and to inform them of those rights. This requirement is not directly broken by distributing your binaries in the form of an SFX archive rather than an archive format that needs to be explicitly unpacked by ...


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You can use license-webpack-plugin to add license information to the webpacked output, which should satisfy the license terms. Alternatively, npm-license-crawler does a pretty good job at consolidating all the licenses you dependencies use, including links to the original licenses, and you could just offer this output, either in CSV or JSON form as a ...


2

The CC0 license allows you to do just about anything you like with that dataset, including distributing it along with your R code in the same package. As a matter of common curtesy, I would recommend that you add things to the documentation of your package A statement that the dataset is licensed separately from the rest of the package under the CC0 ...


2

You propose to write a piece of glueware which on one end is designed to interface with a variety of standard free software publishing sites (github, gitlab, sourceforge, etc.) and download software from them, internally refactor it, then present it on the other end to the user's standard system software installer (apt, yum, dnf, etc.). You want to know if ...


2

Apps usually have a separate screen where they collect license and attribution notices. If your app has a settings screen, you could add an “about” section where you mention yourself and also link to the screen with open source libraries. Here's the Settings > About screen on the Todoist Android app, which is closed source: Description: The “About” ...


2

You must comply with the licenses of all the software that you distribute. Must I include the license statement of every library in the bundle? Yes, if that is required by a license in your bundle. Most open source licenses including MIT, LGPL, GPL require this. Would it be sufficient to only have the license files in the public repo? No, most licenses ...


1

The easiest solution is to just ship the open-source code alongside the product, in a SD card or USB Stick. Deeply embedded open-source code inaccessible by the user is the very definition of inconspicuous. Also there may be size/performance/configuration restrictions hindering compliance on such platforms, unlike say a Ubuntu OS, where the user can interact ...


1

Yes, your interpretation is correct. If you received a package under the GPLv3 license, then any modified versions you publish (make available to others) must also be published under the GPLv3 license. When you have multiple, independent, packages in your repository, then you can either use the same license for all of them (which would have to be the GPLv3 ...


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You should maintain their copyright notices intact; this is required by eg GPLv3 s4. You can do this by forking their repository, or copying it to another git hosting service, or publishing tarballs; the GPL doesn't care about how you preserve them. As for acknowledging yourself, you should add a copyright notice of your own. Yes. GPLv3 s5c says you may ...


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The GPL license on the library does not strictly imply that you must use the GPL license on the program. The GPL license requires that the rights that users get under the GPL license are extended to all code in the application, but that can also be achieved by using a GPL-compatible open-source license. Additionally, the GPL license requires that you ...


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I am not a lawyer, and this is not legal advice. If your library has a linking dependency on a library (e.g. dynamic linking at runtime or statically linking it into your library at build time) and that dependency is licensed under the GPL, then your library must also be GPL. However, if your project is just a collection of scripts that downloads and ...


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If I understand your question correctly, you can simple add this information to your POM file. The following is an example from the Maven POM reference. <licenses> <license> <name>Apache License, Version 2.0</name> <url>https://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0.txt</url> <distribution>repo</...


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