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18 votes
Accepted

Why is the Non-Profit Open Software License (NPOSL) OSI-approved?

NPOSL is an Open Source license; you've made a common reading error with the license text. It's the licensor, not the licensee, that needs to be a non-profit. In other words, a non-profit could ...
congusbongus's user avatar
  • 8,949
8 votes
Accepted

Does OSL 3.0 require user access to source if I sell access to it as SAAS?

Yes; OSL 3.0 is a copyleft license that also applies if you provide network access to the output of your software, as in SaaS. From the source: External Deployment Defined OSL 3.0 requires ...
congusbongus's user avatar
  • 8,949
6 votes
Accepted

When does a dependency imply a derivative work?

The OSL defines "Derivative Works" as to translate, adapt, alter, transform, modify, or arrange the Original Work, thereby creating derivative works ("Derivative Works") based upon the ...
EMBLEM's user avatar
  • 2,548
3 votes
Accepted

OSL v3.0 - Can I sell my software based on OSL v3.0 code source?

The OSL 3.0 is a rather uncommon, less used open source license. It is in spirit similar to the AGPL licenses in that a usage in "external deployments" may trigger the license copyleft terms. So in ...
Philippe Ombredanne's user avatar
1 vote

Does OSL 3.0 require user access to source if I sell access to it as SAAS?

I would like to add my understanding of OSL 3.0. The point is that OSL 3.0 license applies to Derivative Works. The OSL 3.0 Approach To Derivative Works OSL 3.0 is far simpler, with the entire ...
user2445712's user avatar

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