5

This is a tough issue that has prevented lots of large companies to move to a more open source business model. Most companies don't understand that just because your code is free doesn't mean you won't make as much money. Options: If you are a sales representative or just a large supporter of open source material. Some things you could do are: explain ...


5

Open Source projects are generally about making software, and the licence is the usual and only-meaningful pledge of this good faith. If you give the software to the users along with the four freedoms, they will have everything they need to look after themselves; they will also have a much more solid knowledge of your ideals than any manifesto or ...


5

the copyright remains with the ostensible owner attached to that account Not quite, the copyright remains with the owners of the code (the copyright owners). In fact, if the software is under an open source license, you are perfectly within your rights to mirror the software elsewhere, even if you’re not the copyright holder. (This is what makes GitHub’s ...


4

A foundation will have a lot of overheads so similar projects joining together can be more efficient. Both monetary overheads, such as paying lawyers, insurance, accountants, auditors; and time commitments, such as meetings, applying for tax deductible status, compliance issues. Joining a foundation also lets you take advantage of the expertise of others. ...


4

You can read the whole thing or go straight to the point (look for a TL;DR) According to me, here's a possible timeline for an Open Source project. The Idea You think the world needs something that software can provide. The initial commits You start off with a Git/SVN/Bzr/Hg repository and start pushing some code to it. You release v0.1 and show it off ...


3

Cost effectiveness and use of resources. Let's use your example of a DB system. You still need hardware to run it all on. That's a "fixed" cost. Using F/OSS won't really change it. You still need a sysadmin/db admin to install/configure/maintain it - that is a "fixed" cost. A fastastic *nix+Postgres guy might cost a little more than a fantastic Windows+...


3

The answers already posted are all correct in that the main pledge of open-source software is the license itself. After all, the license is the only thing, legally speaking, that makes sure you abide by your promised terms. However, there are numerous badges you can use to show that your pledge to open-source. Like these: You can use these as badges for ...


2

I'm looking for ways to communicate to my users that our project is committed to making the world a better place. Are you sure it's not committed to making some piece of software? I mean, sure, that software can be used to make the world a better place, but is that what you mean? Or - do you want to talk about what the organization/contributors do other ...


2

If you release Free/Open Source software, anyone can use it regardless of morals. You can't make a guarantee that your software will be used only for good. Evil people will be able to take it and modify and use it for their own purposes. You can of course run an ethical project. You indicate your support for F/OSS by releasing your software under an ...


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