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1

Material that is published under any license at all is copyrighted, and that copyright ought to be formally registered with the government. Whether or not it has been registered, however, it is "owned." And, "ownership has its privileges." One of those privileges is that the owner can choose to license it any way he likes, and he can ...


2

A had “no apparent license”. Without a license, you can do what copyright law allows you to do, which is very little. So It was not legal for B to publish A under the MIT license. Legally, it was never published under that license. Instead, you were duped into thinking it was. Now A is offering a license. B can now be published with a valid license, but not ...


4

Are the old commits in project A with MIT still considered MIT? No, that code was never licensed under the MIT license: the individual(s) that made that offer to you never hard the right to make it in the first place. You may as well ask if the deed to the Brooklyn Bridge that you bought in an alleyway is still valid, even if the state of New York told you ...


2

You propose to write software to be offered to others as SaaS on a commercial (and, presumably, proprietary) basis. This software will not be entirely created de novo; you wish to use pre-existing freely-licensed software in the creation of your offering, and you have some questions. What other types of licenses can I use in addition? All free software ...


4

I think my esteemed colleague has said all that's really necessary in comments supra, but it would be good to have this in an answer. The question you ask is known, philosophically, as that of the Ship of Theseus: if you replace all the parts of a thing, is it any longer the original thing? I am not aware of any definitive answers in copyright jurisprudence....


2

One can hardly copyright the idea of an application which allows to write documents or which allows to do calculations on and in a table or to create and display presentations. Other than that, Microsoft's products have nothing in common, least of all any code which a copyright claim would have to be based on, with the competing products which are not ...


6

Under current legal precedent in the United States, LibreOffice et al. did not commit copyright infringement. Look to Lotus v. Borland for the U.S. precedent allowing duplication of interfaces. The code used to create each computer program is copyrightable and may not be duplicated without permission, but the functional components of the rendered interface ...


2

First, verify that the image is indeed MIT-licensed. The project's README (or other documentation) may specify different licenses for code versus other media assets. If the image is indeed MIT-licensed, then there is no copyright restriction against using the image, as long as you abide by the license's terms. Namely, you must preserve the license text and ...


6

If a software is distributed under several different licenses, then you are usually allowed to choose which license offer you take up; you then have to abide by all the terms and conditions of the license - but not necessarily by all of the other license offer you did not take. This is common for dual-licensed software where one form is a copyleft licensed (...


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