New answers tagged

5

Firstly, let's clear up some terminology: I have decided NOT to fork the project, but instead clone it and rebrand it and publish it under a different name. The term "fork" generally means exactly what you're doing: taking a project, and creating your own derivative work with different stewardship. You are doing so as allowed by the copyright ...


0

As the owner of the copyright, it is your prerogative to allow others to do the things covered by copyright law (notably copying and distributing further) under whatever conditions you'd like. You can offer the recipient several alternative sets of conditions (i.e., use it under GPLv2, or under Apache, or..., or you are allowed --presumably for a fee-- to ...


1

Generally, this is called Multi-licensing when you want a particular product to have more than one condition. Any product can have more than a single license. In Open Source it has its own term which is called dual-licensing, and its use-case is similar to that of the general team Multi-licensing, we do this when we want our open source project to have two ...


0

I think Free Software Foundation would say codes that will work with R.dll need to follow GPL license when distributing them. (ref) http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-faq.en.html#GPLStaticVsDynamic


4

The FSF says of the JSON License: This ["not-for-evil" term] is a restriction on usage and thus conflicts with freedom 0. The restriction might be unenforcible, but we cannot presume that. Thus, the license is nonfree. Similarly it is not open source because it conflicts with term 6 of the Open Source Definition, "No Discrimination Against ...


1

what if some of the third-party libraries I use are released under some open source licence but which is not totally compatible with GPL3? License compatibility is very black-and-white. Either a license is compatible with the GPLv3 or it is not. There is no such thing as "partially compatible". To give some piece of mind, the MIT and BSD licenses ...


4

As we've discussed above, when you say "we want to let them use [our library of controls]", the devil is in the word use. If you're asking "can we let the members of this project run our code without having to pay for it", then the answer is of course "yes". But I suspect that what the project wants is to incorporate your ...


3

By using the GNU General Public License as the only binding factor between the organization and developers. License which explicitly requires all the surrounding code needed to build, install and run the software to be libre too. From the license: All the source code needed to generate, install, and (for an executable work) run the object code and to modify ...


3

The license says verbatim: The GPL requires that modified versions be marked as changed, so that their problems will not be attributed erroneously to authors of previous versions. It means that if you make a derivative program, you shall make explicit that it's a different one. Not that any change within the same program shall be tracked. That was most ...


4

There is no particularly good solution. Open Source software needs maintenance, which has costs – at the very least, it will cost time. This is a tragedy of the commons scenario where everyone benefits from contributions, but it's not generally advantageous for anyone to contribute. A potential solution is that one entity shoulders almost the entire cost, in ...


2

So, is it wrong to demand changes in open-source projects? Yes, it is wrong. The maintainer(s) of the project don't owe you anything. They are under no obligation to do what you want. Consider this analogy. Alice makes chocolate chip cookies for her family every Friday and, he makes some extras to give to folks in the neighborhood. Bob loves Alice's ...


3

Is it wrong? Who knows - that depends very much on personal position. Is it helpful? I'd argue not. If you're not writing the code yourself, you need to persuade someone else that they want to make the changes. A time-honoured means is to offer payment - but don't assume that alone will convince anyone, no matter how large the amount. A more constructive ...


1

I would say that interpreter provides an isolation and would just give some examples: If I distribute a program including LuaJ and some lua script, is that one program? I would say so. And if I publish the lua script I wrote for it to be GPL, does it mean that LuaJ is GPL? I hope we see the problem here. That should not change what license LuaJ is. Also, ...


4

The GPL is not specific to any technology like Java vs Lua, Windows vs Linux. To determine the scope of the GPL, we have but one question to consider: does this form a single program? This question is not for the GPL to answer, it is a question for copyright law. However, the GPL authors have opinions on this question, which I regard as sufficiently ...


6

I'm not sure you (for whom English is presumably a second language) understand what the word "demand" means: to ask or call for with authority : claim as due or just If, however, English is your first language then you're be a rude and presumptuous jack a$$ for demanding that someone else do something for you for free.


18

It's not wrong to ask for features in open-source projects. Preferably in a gentle and well-educated manner. Of course, the people maintaining it are under no obligation to fulfill that. Quite often, you might find that they don't implement it right away, but it stays there, awaiting someone motivated enough to do it (this could range from yourself coding it ...


10

Yes, it is wrong to demand anything of open source projects. Open Source developers tend to first and foremost implement features or work on bugs that are relevant to themselves; and secondarily they will work on features that bring the software further along because the changes are useful and "good" (subjectively speaking, in the opinion of the ...


16

Let's refocus the question to address the security aspect of https://github.com/echojs/echojs/issues/12 (other great answers already address the tone of demanding a fix and calling for a volunteer project to be shut down). When I complain about some software vulnerability there is always someone who says "Instead of reporting/demanding this, just ...


49

I'm not a native English speaker but to me "demanding" implies having authority. A policeman can demand that you show your hands; a teacher can demand that the students be quiet. A parent can demand that the children wash hands before dinner. If you indeed use that word or behaved like the authorities in these examples you imply having authority ...


2

As in every other place: talk to people and communicate about the matters at hand. Usually FLOSS is a meritocracy... so to become a member means to become engaged consistently and positively and constructively and people will start to remember you - especially if you tackle the nasty bugs - that usually is valued more than to just go there to push your shiny ...


100

Suppose that I tell you that I require you to cease posting here, immediately come round to my house, and cook me lunch. Your first response might, very reasonably, be "who on earth is this person and why should I spend my time and energy fulfilling his agenda instead of my own?". It's not that demanding new features in open-source projects is ...


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