102 votes
Accepted

Is it wrong to demand features in open-source projects?

Suppose that I tell you that I require you to cease posting here, immediately come round to my house, and cook me lunch. Your first response might, very reasonably, be "who on earth is this ...
  • 39.8k
73 votes
Accepted

Why did Google make Chromium Open Source?

Companies produce open source software for a variety of reasons, including marketing and developer relations. But I don't want to speculate. Instead, I want to point out three aspects: Browsers don't ...
  • 34.4k
49 votes

Is it wrong to demand features in open-source projects?

I'm not a native English speaker but to me "demanding" implies having authority. A policeman can demand that you show your hands; a teacher can demand that the students be quiet. A parent ...
30 votes

What guarantees that the published app matches the published open source code?

In addition to Mureinik's excellent point, there is a general move towards reproducible builds in FLOSS, which provides a useful halfway house between build it yourself and distributor publishes a ...
  • 39.8k
24 votes

Trying to understand an old custom license

This is not a license, as it grants no rights. By default all works are copyrighted and their allowed use is limited unless the rights owner gives you further permissions. Licenses grant further ...
  • 428
23 votes

What prevents a large company with deep pockets from rebranding my MIT project and killing me off?

There is not much which would disallow that. The MIT license is pretty liberal and as long as one obeys the requirement to display the copyright notice in the product appropriately, there's not much ...
  • 8,604
21 votes

Why did Google make Chromium Open Source?

Google is broadly not in the business of selling copies of software. Google is in the business of offering Internet and Web services, most often accessed through a browser. The overwhelming dominance ...
  • 31.6k
19 votes
Accepted

Trying to understand an old custom license

For (1), the only answer is "nobody knows" (apart from possibly the person who wrote the license). Given that, I would therefore be conservative and assume that it is a mandatory requirement....
18 votes

What prevents a large company with deep pockets from rebranding my MIT project and killing me off?

Firstly, this is against the spirit of open source; if you don't want people exploiting your work without paying you, don't use open source licenses in the first place. rebranding However, you do ...
  • 391
18 votes

Is it wrong to demand features in open-source projects?

It's not wrong to ask for features in open-source projects. Preferably in a gentle and well-educated manner. Of course, the people maintaining it are under no obligation to fulfill that. Quite often, ...
  • 451
18 votes
Accepted

How to make my iOS project source-closed while it must use open source code?

Nearly no way if we talk GPL. If you use GPLv3 code in your project or you use it for reference for a re-implementation or port, you are bound by the license. That's the point of a license: you are ...
  • 8,604
16 votes

Is it wrong to demand features in open-source projects?

Let's refocus the question to address the security aspect of https://github.com/echojs/echojs/issues/12 (other great answers already address the tone of demanding a fix and calling for a volunteer ...
16 votes
Accepted

If I am going to change the name of my open source project, what should I do?

You don't need to do anything. Open source licenses derive their power from copyright law, and neither copyright law nor the Apache license itself care about the name under which a product is released....
15 votes
Accepted

What guarantees that the published app matches the published open source code?

As a general problem, I'm not aware of a robust way to validate that a given binary matches a given source repository (see, e.g., this discussion on Security.SE). Ultimately, it boils down to a ...
  • 4,102
15 votes

What guarantees that the published app matches the published open source code?

Short answer: You can't. There's a famous paper Reflections on Trusting Trust by Ken Thompson about how the compiler itself could be inserting the malicious code, including when compiling itself. The ...
  • 451
13 votes

Why did Google make Chromium Open Source?

By making Chromium open source, Google succeeded in turning almost all competing browsers into rebranded copies of Chrome and getting to set all the baseline behavior/policy that would go into them. ...
12 votes

Trying to understand an old custom license

In a corporate environment I would advise my colleagues not to use this code for the reason that it is an unconventional license and the legal interpretation is not clear. This would even be in case ...
11 votes
Accepted

I made my own open source license. Is it any good? Is it legal?

I was wondering if this license would hold any water or if it is legal. My legal knowledge is nil. This screams "BAD IDEA" at me. There's a reason that lawyers train for as long as they do. ...
  • 8,830
11 votes

What prevents a large company with deep pockets from rebranding my MIT project and killing me off?

Reading "Business Model Generation" by Alexander Osterwalder helped me understand a) how businesses actually work, b) how selling software actually works, and c) how open-source companies (...
  • 211
10 votes

Is it wrong to demand features in open-source projects?

Yes, it is wrong to demand anything of open source projects. Open Source developers tend to first and foremost implement features or work on bugs that are relevant to themselves; and secondarily they ...
  • 310
10 votes

Merging parts of another, parallel, fork [MIT]

You are thinking very much about Git, and not at all about the existing MIT license. You can just copy Jack's code. You do have explicit permission – the MIT license under which you received Jack's ...
  • 34.4k
9 votes

Trying to understand an old custom license

As jpa notes, there is no license here. The notice you've quoted grants no right to redistribute the code, with or without modification. (And yes, I checked the full comment at the top of the ...
8 votes

How can I trust to Open Source programs?

It is true that the developer of the original application can be malicious: Ken Thompson's famous (and seminal, and also very readable) paper "Reflections on Trusting Trust" makes clear just ...
  • 39.8k
8 votes
Accepted

OS license and responsibility for code modification

To quote from the MIT License: THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS ...
8 votes

Is it legal to use/run open source software for any purpose?

Software published under a Free or Open Source license do not put any restrictions on how the software can be used - that is one of the fundamental freedoms in both the Free Software Definition and ...
8 votes
Accepted

google_font license (Apache2.0) has no Copyright what to do?

Section 4(c) lists the only obligations you have with regards to copyright notices: You must retain, in the Source form of any Derivative Works that You distribute, all copyright, patent, trademark, ...
  • 31.6k
8 votes
Accepted

If I use a mobile app that fetches data from a website under GPLv2+ is the app also under GPL?

The license of an application and the license of data that application produces can be independent, and are only interrelated if the data includes executable code from the executable itself: Is there ...
  • 31.6k
8 votes

Why should software be free when housing, education, groceries, books, movies, music and utilities are not?

I suspect your question is predicated on the idea that universal software freedom might result in software development labor becoming economically worthless. This conclusion isn't correct. In a ...
  • 31.6k
7 votes
Accepted

What can I do if somebody copied my MPL-2.0 licensed code and released under their name?

The MPL-2.0 license does not require that Contributors add a copyright notice or in another way mark files as changed and it also doesn't contain any explicit clauses about mis-representation. Based ...
7 votes

Are Open Source Licenses valid globally?

TL/DR: Yes, Open Source licenses are valid in Turkey and nearly globally. Open Source copyright licenses are based on copyright law. While each country has its own copyright laws, there is an ...

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible