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One can hardly copyright the idea of an application which allows to write documents or which allows to do calculations on and in a table or to create and display presentations. Other than that, Microsoft's products have nothing in common, least of all any code which a copyright claim would have to be based on, with the competing products which are not ...


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Under current legal precedent in the United States, LibreOffice et al. did not commit copyright infringement. Look to Lotus v. Borland for the U.S. precedent allowing duplication of interfaces. The code used to create each computer program is copyrightable and may not be duplicated without permission, but the functional components of the rendered interface ...


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