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5

No-one knows. It's not the licence, nor the FSF, that determines what constitutes a derivative work - it is copyright law. Since no higher court has (to my knowledge) taken a position on this, we simply don't yet know. There are persuasive arguments that it does; there are persuasive arguments that it doesn't. Until courts start to rule on the issues, ...


4

The GPL with some linking exception is still just the GPL, but with extra permissions. These extra permissions only apply to a specific module, and they do not extend to other modules that are only licensed under the GPL, without this extra permission. Therefore, you cannot create your own modules with a linking exception as an isolation layer between GPL ...


3

The relinking requirement says that whenever an LGPL library is distributed linked to a (possibly proprietary) application, recipients of that code must be able to substitute in a modified LGPL library attached to the application. A hypothetical LGPL that did not require this would still grant a useful sets of rights. Suppose libFoo is distributed under ...


3

You can create and distribute proprietary software using most libraries that ship with mingw. In general, if you are using a library (which includes libstdc++, libgcc and libwinpthread in your question) your program is subject to the license of the library. If the library is distributed under GPL, your program would also be subject to GPL. Because of this, ...


2

Will they sue me!? They could and they should. But I don't know the business strategy of Qt (the corporation). And if I did know, I won't speak of it on a forum. Your question is equivalent to: "I stole a piece of bread at my baker's. Will he sue me?" The answer is always: "it depends"


2

Whether you statically or dynamically link to any GPL code, you need to follow the terms of the GPL. As you say no one in Algeria pays for software, you obviously don't expect to sell your program. If you are planning to sell it outside Algeria, then you are expecting to get money that you can use to buy a non-GPL license. Remember the GPL only says you ...


1

Linking is a common proxy for whether or not something is a derivative work of a copyleft licensed software project, but in the LGPL case, it doesn't matter whether the linking is static or dynamic - mere linking does not create a derivative work. Instead, you have to make modifications to the source code of the LGPL project itself for it to be counted as a ...


1

Firstly note that while linking to a GPL library means you have to comply with the GPL terms, that doesn't mean that your code has to be licensed under the GPL, only that the license you use cannot prevent users complying with the GPL terms. This is where GPL compatible licenses come into play, which includes Apache 2.0 and Modified BSD (3-clause). Note in ...


1

No, the AGPL does not introduce a new kind of linking. The GPL and AGPL derive their validity solely from copyright. With regards to linking, they are only applicable insofar as linking creates a derivative work that could otherwise not be used without violating the copyright of the linked code. The licenses cannot invent new kinds of linking. However, they ...


1

You do not need to provide the source to applications that you merely communicate with over the network. If your application is linked to another codebase (the definition is the same in both the GPL and AGPL), then you need to provide the source as usual. In most cases, this simply means that you can regard your application as running on the user's machine. ...


1

I am not a lawyer, but I my understanding is that "GPL linking exception" refers to any linking exception applied to a GPL license by its owner. Such exceptions allow the module to be linked and distributed with other non-GPL modules. The Classpath exception is one instance of linking exception, granted by the GNU Classpath project. Other projects, like the ...


1

Firstly, IANAL/IANYL, and the whole question of derivative works is still somewhat unsettled by courts around the world. That said, the FSF addresses this issue with respect to plugins, and since copyright law makes no explicit mention of plugins as being special, the analysis can be applied to other questions of derivative works. They write: A main ...


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