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1

As you note, there are two ways to interpret a licence grant of A + B. Firstly, that either the terms of A or the terms of B apply to the conveyance, at the recipient's discretion; secondly, that the requirements (and other terms) of both A and B apply to the conveyance. The first interpretation is more common in the free software world, but that doesn't ...


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I am not an academic. If you want an answer from an academic's point of view, you should ask over at our sister site Academia. From a licensing viewpoint, there is nothing wrong with having your manuscript under the MIT license, especially if it is a good description of the design and/or behaviour of the software. If someone forks your repository to make ...


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A corner stone of open-source licensing is that anyone and everyone is allowed to redistribute or republish the work. If you don't want that, then you must not use an open-source license. To protect your project from re-publication, any license that does not allow redistribution is sufficient, or even no license at all. It does not matter if people can ...


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