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4

Open source licenses are not allowed to discriminate against fields of endeavor. That means you cannot use an open source license for your code and use that license to prevent competitors from opening shop. Some things that are possible with various open source licenses are: The AGPL requires that modified versions must be under the AGPL license and their ...


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You could choose any license. As the copyright holder, you are free to do whatever you want with your own software.


3

Let's say that someone uses your project (licensed under your custom license) in an MIT licensed application. Since the MIT license explicitly allows the software to be distributed closed source, your custom license would be ineffective and would not make sense. If you do not want your library to be used in proprietary software, then the best choice would be ...


4

There's two fundamentally different takes on open source licenses: a) the permissive ones like MIT, Apache etc which - roughly speaking - don't care what happens to their sources as long as the credits are maintained and communicated. b) And there's the more strictly open source licenses, the copy-left licenses, which want to make sure that any derivative ...


3

The CC0 is an excellent instrument for making it possible for everyone to use a software. It effectively disclaims all copyright you may have to the fullest degree possible. Thus, if you want anyone to use your code without further restrictions (including without any requirement to attribute you), then CC0 is an excellent choice. There are some downsides to ...


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