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2

If you are the sole copyright holder, then the answer is very simple: You are not bound by any license, so you are allowed to do anything you want including those things that most licenses forbid. If you are not the sole copyright holder (e.g. you accepted contributions from others), then things become more complicated but not all is lost. If there are only ...


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There is no schematic rule which fits all. Do something which fulfills the license terms and fits the way you distribute your project. E.g. the MIT license requires The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software. The GPL suggests If the program does terminal interaction, make ...


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It's simple: if you distribute software, you have to abide by the licenses. If you thus sell a device with different software on it, you have to abide by all the licenses concurrently, that includes the OS. Usually includes at least making available the copyright / credits and license information to the user in some way. For copy-left licensed software (thus ...


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You must comply with the licenses of all the software that you distribute. Must I include the license statement of every library in the bundle? Yes, if that is required by a license in your bundle. Most open source licenses including MIT, LGPL, GPL require this. Would it be sufficient to only have the license files in the public repo? No, most licenses ...


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It sounds to me as if you want AGPLv3. A requirement that the Original Developer is attributed in distributions AGPLv3 s4 provides that "You may convey verbatim copies of the Program's source code as you receive it, in any medium, provided that you conspicuously and appropriately publish on each copy an appropriate copyright notice", so the ...


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A license is GPL-compatible if it allows you to do everything that the GPL allows you to do, and if the license doesn't impose requirements or conditions other than those which the GPL also has or allows. Both of the licenses you've shown are permissive licenses and seem open source, similar to the MIT or BSD licenses. They seem to provide you with the ...


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As mentioned in the comments, if the data is part of the code the copyleft may apply. But that is rather a gray area because including the data would not necessarily imply a derivative work. Better ask the original author and/or a lawyer :D If you just pull the data in runtime, you are perfectly fine with any license otherwise possible. That's what CC is for!...


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