New answers tagged

0

It looks like with the post provided by @Nikos C., LGPL 2.1 requires the object code to be published. I just decided to get rid of this hassle and use a different library.


3

Will the software have to be GPL? That depends on how closely your software depends on the post-processing by ffmpeg in particular. If ffmpeg is just one of potentially many (independently developed) programs that can read and process the files your app creates, then your app is a separate and independent work from ffmpeg as far as copyright is concerned ...


1

The question is not what your code depends on, but what the program includes. Assuming that your code doesn't include any snippets from these libraries, you can most likely license your source code under whatever license you want. Things are different if you compile or bundle your code along with all dependencies into a program/executable. Now that program ...


0

The AGPLv3 is the same license as the GPLv3, with an extra section that requires you to provide the source code when you modified the AGPLv3-covered software, and users interact with the software remotely over a network. Since you haven't modified the AGPL-covered software, we can treat it as the GPLv3 for this discussion. So would the use of a GPLv3-...


3

The LGPLv2.1 contains these paragraphs that is directly relevant to your question When a "work that uses the Library" uses material from a header file that is part of the Library, the object code for the work may be a derivative work of the Library even though the source code is not. Whether this is true is especially significant if the work can ...


Top 50 recent answers are included