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17

You cannot change the license of code from others, such as mysql-connector-java. That license is set by the author of that particular component (Oracle company). If your client stated the requirement up front, you have a problem. But otherwise you can just decline the request, and state that this is outside your control. P.S. The use of the term "...


6

mysql-connector/j is licensed as GPLv2 by Oracle but has a FOSS Exception. If you want to distribute your software as FOSS, you can choose any license "that is OSI-approved and/or categorized by the FSF as free". Otherwise you must use a different library or buy a commercial license from Oracle. And you cannot change the license of mysql-connector/...


5

There is no limitation on the Java Runtime Environment (JRE) or Java Development Kit (JDK) you can use for free in commercial software. You've misunderstood how Java is licensed: First of all, Java is more like a specification than a piece of software. Oracle publishes the Java specification which defines how the language and runtime work, and anyone can ...


4

According to https://www.mysql.com/about/legal/licensing/oem/, you are free to use any approved open source license for your code even if it is using the GPL'd MySQL library. The license used by recent versions of mysql-connector-java is described here: https://oss.oracle.com/licenses/universal-foss-exception/ Here is an excerpt of the LICENSE file provided ...


3

Regardless of technologies you use for distribution, you must comply with the license. The Apache license requires that you include a copy the license text + NOTICE file with your software. The appropriate mechanism for this could be the JAR's META-INF system, but it might be more appropriate to (additionally) put copies into your software's documentation or ...


3

I do not know why the author of the SO answer writes as sie does. Having stated that you can't redistribute only parts of OpenJDK, sie then summarises the GPL as saying that you may "modify the program’s source code and distribute the modified source", which explicitly permits you to redistribute only parts of OpenJDK. Yes, you may strip out of ...


2

Regardless of how you remove the class, this is a modification of the work under license, and can be done only in full compliance with the license of the libraries. While this might seem absurd, let me illustrate with a more concrete but hypothetical example why it is so: Imagine you are the director of a museum. The museum gets the copy of a wonderful ...


1

TL/DR: Yes, it is allowed to distribute the Android Studio JRE that you have along with your game in the way that packr did. Both the OpenJDK and the Andoid Studio JRE that you use appear to be licensed under the GPLv2 license with the Classpath exception1. The GPL version 2 is an open source license that allows redistribution of the covered code under the ...


1

When I distribute software to a customer, is it mandatory to publish proprietary source code as well under the CDDLv1.0 license? The only code that must have sources published under the CDDL 1.0 license is the original library that came under that license and any modifications (edits, additions, deletions) you made to that library. Code that simply uses/...


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