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If this is an application you are developing, there's no problem: as the copyright holder, you can do whatever you like. If you want to permit other people to develop closed-source plugins for your application, it's recommended that you add an exception clause to your license statement (eg. "Plugins for MyApplication that use the documented plugin API can ...


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Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer and this is not legal advice. GPL is a copyleft license. It means that you legally obliged to distribute derivative work under the same or equivalent license (see here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GNU_General_Public_License#Linking_and_derived_works for instance). LGPL is a more relaxed license in this regard and allows ...


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No, what you propose is not legal. The LGPL license is written in such a way that the linking exception only works one way. All the code that an LGPL library depends on must be under a GPL-compatible open-source license Code that depends on an LGPL library may use a GPL-incompatible license. The fact that the LGPL library gets used by a GPL application is ...


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A GPL-licensed library requires that any programme making use of it is also distributed under the GPL. However a GPL-licensed programme does not require that all libraries (or modules) it uses are also GPL-licensed. The modules can be under GPL or other licenses which are more permissive (like BSD, Apache, LGPL etc).


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The GPL license on the library does not strictly imply that you must use the GPL license on the program. The GPL license requires that the rights that users get under the GPL license are extended to all code in the application, but that can also be achieved by using a GPL-compatible open-source license. Additionally, the GPL license requires that you ...


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As S1 and S2 communicate over a REST interface (and thus a network connection), their communication is considered to be "at arms length." This means that S1 and S2 are considered independent works for copyright considerations and the GPL license of S2 does not affect S1. Copyright is also independent of how you package a product or combination of products. ...


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Yes, that would be allowed. Versions of a software product that don't derive from/use GPL code are not subject to the GPL licensing terms, so you can use whatever license ou like for those versions. If the people using the development builds are all part of the same organisation, which holds the copyright on the project, then there the use of the GPL ...


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Mandatory disclaimer: I am not a lawyer. As far as I understand it, GPL allows your program to depend on non-GPL "system libraries", which are: The “System Libraries” of an executable work include anything, other than the work as a whole, that (a) is included in the normal form of packaging a Major Component, but which is not part of that Major Component,...


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