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12

If I fork a library that uses the GPL3 license and heavily modify it, can I then release the new library with an ApacheV2 license No, you may not. Your library is still, by your own admission, a derivative of the original GPLv3 code. GPLv3 s5c says that if you convey a derivative work, you must do so under GPLv3. I've also contacted the original project'...


5

No. But maybe. The GPL applies to all derivative works as a whole. When you modify some code, that is a derivative work and has to be GPL-licensed. However, if you can clearly identify parts that are not derivative but entirely your creation, then you can license those parts under any other license as well, including Apache-2. It is in theory possible that ...


3

If you read the FSF's page on how to use the GPL for your software, the exact language they recommend for a GPLvN+ (GPL version N or any later) licence grant is This program is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the ...


3

Yes, you can use an MIT-licensed library in an GPL-licensed application. The MIT license is a permissive license that is compatible with the GPL license, so there is no problem at all. When the library is used in the context of the GPL application, the GPL terms and conditions also apply to the library, but when the library is used independently from the GPL ...


2

A section for "how to cite" is legally speaking a nice-to-have part often found in repositories used for academic research. It is not a requirement by the licenses which require that proper attribution is given or retained within the repository as to not mis-represent who contributed and what is the license. The suggestion on how to cite generally ...


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