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Distributing the GPL binary linked to the closed-source lib will be a license violation. See FAQ. However it depends a bit on circumstance. If the library can be used on its own or with another software, thus independent of the GPL binary and is distributed separately so that the user combines the work: likely fine. It is also fine if it is merely an ...


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No, the GPLv2 is incompatible with the GPLv3. The FSF says of v2 and v3 compatibility: Please note that GPLv2 is, by itself, not compatible with GPLv3. However, most software released under GPLv2 allows you to use the terms of later versions of the GPL as well. When this is the case, you can use the code under GPLv3 to make the desired combination. If ...


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I'm sure the idea isn't original in Linux. If you rummage around in oldish data structure books (or books on assembly language programming, LISP implementations, or perhaps even in Knuth's "The Art of Computer Programming") you'll find rampant reuse of "spare" bits.


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Copyright protects creative expression, not ideas. So feel free to use such bit twiddling tricks in your software. TBH, tagging pointers in the lower or upper bits is a fairly standard technique in low-level C. You are of course most welcome to copy Linux' implementation into your software, but then the GPL would clearly apply. It may be worth pointing out ...


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If your software just needs a particular set of (virtual) USB ports and doesn't care how the user manages to achieve that, then your software is independent from the GPL tool to create virtual USB ports from a copyright perspective. This means that the copyright licenses on the two pieces of software don't affect each other in any way. Does that mean I ...


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