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16

You have a misconception here. You're thinking that licenses take away your right to use a piece of code. In fact, licenses give you the right to use a piece of code. If there's no license, you can't use it. The exception is fair use: if you want to use the code in a way which is fair use, then that is permitted, whether or not there's a license. But if you ...


18

With licenses it is actually quite simple: No license means no rights to you to even use the code for whatever purpose. Code being available somewhere for download doesn't imply any right to use it - similar as you don't have the right to harvest a field, just because you can enter it from the street. If there is a license that specifies the conditions ...


50

Generally speaking, a licence grant is not revocable once it has been relied on. Once an author has published a piece of code under a licence, and someone has taken a copy on that basis, the author cannot retrospectively revoke that licence. If that licence permitted the recipient to make further copies, as free licences do, then you can get a copy from ...


3

I made an open-source blog theme(template) based on Hugo's static web page generator. That's pretty much the beginning and the end of the analysis, right there. Your work is a derivative of Hugo's generator, by your own admission. I just removed all the code that I referenced from that person's Hugo theme now. This brings you up against what is known ...


3

It probably depends: This does not look like adding source code. It looks like what makefiles add to a repository: instructions how to build your programme from source, specifying tooling in the required order. So it is an indication of using a certain toollike certain flags for certain compilers, to use make or whatever is needed to build your programme ...


3

The answer obviously depends on the project and the best course of action can only be found by talking to the core devs / maintainers / community around the project. There is two ways to approach this: You can (start to) go through issues and make appropriate comments, maybe with links to where / when it was implemented. Concurrently (or before) you may ...


5

I've been in projects that would be absolutely delighted to have a volunteer come in and do scut work like that, and I've been in projects that got really quite upset when lots of old issues were resurrected when everyone was happy to just let them be dead. You, very sensibly, wish to know what kind of project yours is before sticking your head above the ...


1

If there's nothing otherwise prohibiting you, you may publish your app code to a public git repository under any license you choose and even with no accompanying license at all. With regard to copyright it depends on applicable laws. In the United States, for example, copyright is automatic and a transfer of that copyright cannot be executed without a ...


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