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3

Pull from the fork, not form PR itself. PR must be coming from another github repo which would be a fork of the main one. That fork must also have LICENSE file along with commits you are interested in, making it clear that code in PRs is licensed under the same license.


6

Not only do GitHub's terms of service codify that the submission would be covered under the Apache 2 license, so too does the Apache 2 license itself: "Contribution" shall mean any work of authorship, including the original version of the Work and any modifications or additions to that Work or Derivative Works thereof, that is intentionally ...


3

Particularly referencing GitHub's Terms of Service, it is highly likely that the PR can be considered to be licensed under the Apache 2.0 license and therefore your company could happily use it in your proprietary project (assuming you give appropriate attribution etc). However, "highly likely" is not "certain" (and "highly likely&...


2

You need to differentiate 2 cases: a) you have your code on GitHub, and b) you distribute your code (e.g. executable) including the dependencies, e.g. as pre-built packages. In case a) you it is sufficient to list the dependencies properly. You need to declare your own license and copyright notice. I recommend (not required) to have SPDX identifiers in each ...


2

Your requirements are incompatible with being open source. Can someone ever steal my code and commercially use it if I put my repo open-source? By making your code open source, you are allowing people to do many things with it, including commercial use. Assuming they abide by the conditions of the license, this would not be "stealing". If that's ...


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