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52

I took part in the development of a FOSS online game myself. An MMORPG, to be precise. We didn't even try to prevent modified clients from connecting. Why? It would be against the philosophy of Free Software. Part of the Free Software Philosophy is that users should have the right to modify the software they use. It is a great way to save work. The GPL ...


45

Much of this is done at levels below that of the source code. Wall hacks, for instance, often work by manipulating the video card so it displays a wireframe rather than textured surfaces. Having the source code doesn't really affect this kind of cheat. The ideal solution is to only send the client what the player can see/know. If he can't see an enemy, don'...


9

I am a PS3 modder and work in low level involving these mods. Here is how I would go about protecting a game from my methods. You cannot prevent everything Any data that the client has, they can manipulate. This involves angles, player coordinates, etc. It is virtually impossible to prevent everything, but you can make it hard to do certain things with a ...


8

What strategies could the server use to ensure that everyone is playing fairly, and exclude modified clients? Could the game even be considered libre software if the server did not allow modified clients to connect? I would consider two different aspects: the server software proper AND the service that I offer to the community and runs this server software. ...


7

Lots of software is focused on solving a particular problem (e.g., performing calculations, handling point of sale transactions, visually rendering and editing pictures/graphs). In those cases, the software is a means to an end: the end user has a need, and they use the software to fill that need. In such cases, there is often an obvious path to monetization:...


6

The only way I know to protect further character names or imagery in an open source game (or for any open source project) would be to use trademarks e.g. if you explicitly mention that the names and images are trademarked by you (and eventually register all of them), then you will enjoy this protection for your names and marks. It is common for several ...


6

If a program is licensed under the GPL, this license affects whether the program can be combined with other creative works (yes, if the combined work will also be licensed under the GPL). However, if the combination does not produce a combined creative work, the GPL license is irrelevant. In particular, the GPL does not extend to data you are processing with ...


4

For point #1, I'd say generally that yes, your game is a derivative, and would need to be licensed under CC-BY-SA 3.0 as well. Fictional characters are protected under copyright, and reuse of those characters in another work requires copyright permission as a derivative work. However, for point #2: Creative Commons licenses are not "software-aware" as it ...


4

What strategies could the server use to ensure that everyone is playing fairly, Define unfair play: What would you consider unfair play of the following examples? Your player is using some tool/modification to... help him aim and shoot at things (aim bot in a FPS) help with your characters skill rotation (in a RPG) predict/guess your opponents cards based ...


3

The only way you can reliably prevent cheating in your scenario is keep as much information and processing as possible on the server. Any anti cheat solution implemented on your game's client can be defeated by the client without your knowledge. For example, a system that tries to verify that a client hasn't been modified relies on the client sending a ...


2

Here's another approach: split the client in 2 parts, one that controls the core gameplay and the other one that is literally chrome around it. Distribute the first one using a typical distro mechanism in the form of signed shared libs -- the code is open and but the server will only accept control using a shared lib with a known signature. The other part of ...


2

These images would be clearly copyrighted. But would it be fair for you to use them nonetheless? At least in the US there is something called "Fair use". For example, this Wikipedia image is a low res image of a game box and contains this fair use related statement: This image is cover art for a video game, and its copyright is most likely held by ...


2

Can you suggest which common license, if any, could cover this case ? No, we can't suggest a license for you, because all the conditions you listed in your draft are restrictions that are not allowed in an open-source license. Else, what should a custom-written license for this particular case specify ? A custom-written license should be written by a ...


2

I want to make it so that the modules cannot be hard coded into these engines themselves... The purpose of these being modules is to be switched out and it defeats the purpose of this ability. In a way, this is exactly what the Lesser GPL (LGPL) v3 requires in 4(d): d) Do one of the following: 0) Convey the Minimal Corresponding Source under the ...


2

Regarding your second option, the LGPLv3 is created by using the "Additional Permission" option from the GPLv3. This means that the clauses from the GPLv3 also apply to the LGPLv3 (except where the LGPL says otherwise). So, the option of granting additional permissions (for example, to create derived classes from the generic classes without invoking the ...


2

Unless you can find the license for this program, you must assume the copyright holder(s), which is likely the company or developers of the game, have not granted you permission to use the graphic outside of the game. Hence, you would not be allowed to use the graphic in your GitHub repository. Microsoft explicitly allows you to post in-game footage of ...


2

Don't go this way. Solve the problem like many did before you successfully: Code and assets are two different things. You should be able to clearly distinguish those. Legally you are not allowed to distribute the assets, unless you have written permission by the original distributors or authors of the original game. Thus the usual solution is to build your ...


1

Make those restrictions a technical requirement, not a license one You don't make that a requirement by putting it in the license. You make it a requirement by not shipping any original or replacement assets, since your replacement engine requires these assets to run the game. Beyond that, it is pointless to put in any extra copy protection, since the ...


1

If you want to do the traditional model where you distribute a binary and avoid people hacking it, you can do that easily in a FLOSS setting. FLOSS means that you give out the sourcecode together with your binary. Nobody keeps you from compiling it, distributing the binary (together with the sourcecode) and then trying to make sure that only this binary can ...


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