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CC BY-ND 4.0 says in section 2(a)(4): Media and formats; technical modifications allowed. The Licensor authorizes You to exercise the Licensed Rights in all media and formats whether now known or hereafter created, and to make technical modifications necessary to do so. The Licensor waives and/or agrees not to assert any right or authority to forbid You ...


14

The syntax of a language is not usually licensed, just the specific implementation of the interpreters and compilers. Programming languages are used to build software like natural languages are used to (let's say) write poems. Specific software implementations could be licensed, like specific poems could be, but the language itself couldn't be. The ...


6

Based on the interpretation of the FSF (the issuer of the GPL): No. On the direct interpretation of your questions title it is pretty obvious. If I write an MS Office document in LibreOffice and read and change it in OpenOffice, it doesn't mean LibreOffice and OpenOffice create a combined work. Even more so if the format that is used for the exchange is ...


6

Free/Libre Software and Open Source refer to the actual implementation of a software project. Open Format refers to the specification of a file format which has been licensed freely so that anyone can make their own software which understands or produces the format. You can have FLOSS software which produces a non-open format. Often software that ...


6

In most cases, you can't copyright or otherwise get IP protection on a file format so there's not much to worry about here, but if you want to make it as easy as possible for other implementations to exist: Write a specification for the file format, completely independent of any implementation for reading or writing that format. Release this specification ...


5

The Original Specification by John Gruber has a licence statement plus RFC 7764 and RFC 7763 may help to clarify this. To me it reads very similar to BSD.


4

Say that -entirely hypothetically and for the sake of a practical example- we are talking about a new "single file container/archive that can be reconstructed even after total loss of file system structures" .... This code is licensed under the AGPL and written in Python. Basically what I would want is: if some dev/company want to make use the file format ...


4

Disclaimer: IANAL, and this strikes me as an area where the principle that 'anyone can sue anyone' might be sadly relevant. This will depend on the nature of the intellectual property of the file format. So, let's imagine that there is proprietary software package that produces and consumes this format, and that the producers of that software considers the ...


4

It is impossible to provide a definitive answer to this, as the answer will often depend on the how and for what purpose the "shared" file format is used. I am sure that there exists multiple instances of two programs sharing data by means of a particular file format that does not make the two programs a combined or derived work. But the opposite may also ...


4

A number of archive formats such as DAR, AR, tar come under the GNU GPL license. This is incorrect. Some software which is capable of managing those formats has been released under the GPL, but the formats themselves are not subject to the license - and cannot be as a file format itself cannot be copyrighted. (The specification of a file format can be ...


2

File formats and protocols are typically not IP-protected. You are generally free to reverse-engineer them. Reverse-engineering for the purpose of compatibility might even be explicitly allowed by your local copyright laws. However: You might only have access to these files under a contract that forbids reverse-engineering. Specific software to read or ...


2

LibreOffice is a fork of OpenOffice, which itself was based on StarOffice. StarOffice corp, before being acquired by Sun Microsystems, had reverse-engineered rough compatibility with MS Office 97 formats, something that several other companies (e.g. Corel) had done as well. When MS released OfficeXP, they published the full spec to their quasi-XML format ...


2

Open source software describes software that can be used freely. What this means in detail is e.g. written down in the Open Source Definition (OSD) or in the Free Software Definition (FSD). The “four freedoms” of the FSD are short enough to be shown here: The freedom to run the program as you wish, for any purpose (freedom 0). The freedom to study ...


2

To begin I cite the Wikipedia about the definition of API: In computer programming, an application programming interface (API) is a set of routines, protocols, and tools for building software applications. An API expresses a software component in terms of its operations, inputs, outputs, and underlying types. So, the if file format describes how ...


2

I would also like to know what "helping the community" means. With Galtungs definition of peace: "mutual and equal benefit", then does "helping" mean it's benefit to everyone in the community equally? Here is an input of mine: http://hintjens.com/blog:68. Specifically, I would like to know which license the docx specification is under. Source: https://msdn....


1

Is using docx will actually helping the community in long term, Certainly not. See the good answer from User for more. In addition, look in your favorite Linux distribution, for .doc or .docx files in the system (outside of e.g. /home/ or directories used by applications, such as /var/www/) and supplied by distribution's packages. You could use locate(1) ...


1

The way I'd read this is that the answer to all three of your questions is: yes. From the FAQ answer you quoted: Once a CC license is applied to a work in one format or medium, a licensee may use the same work in any other format or medium ... As you correctly stated, you can't omit parts of a work under an ND license. So as long as everything is intact,...


1

If the copyright for the files is owned by you (the project creator) or owned by the person using your software, then I believe patents are your only concern. You did not make a copy of the proprietary software, so nothing to worry about with regard to copyright. Your users are allowed to do anything they choose with the files, because they own them. Or if ...


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