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29 votes
Accepted

When the project owner offers contribution on an issue that I am not the issue author, how long should I wait?

You are massively overthinking this. The author of the issue has given no indication they are working on a fix, or want to work on a fix, the owner has requested a fix be made, you can do a fix, just ...
Philip Kendall's user avatar
23 votes

Etiquette for an incorrect Pull Request

Oops, my bad. Everything was correct after all. seems absolutely fine to me. You could add "sorry for the distraction" or similar if you wanted to.
Philip Kendall's user avatar
22 votes
Accepted

When forking an open-source project, what should I do with the maintainers' emails included in the source code?

It sounds like you are going the correct approach: you change the name of the project you acknowledge the previous authors and keep their copyright notices you add your own copyright info and contact ...
planetmaker's user avatar
  • 11.2k
15 votes

Etiquette for an incorrect Pull Request

To add to Philip Kendall's answer: After explaining and/or apologizing, don't leave the PR open. If you agree it's fundamentally redundant, close it yourself:
Mureinik's user avatar
  • 5,142
13 votes

Starting (not forking) a new project based on a seemingly dead one

Forking and starting your own repo and submitting a PR to the current repo are not mutually exclusive. You could do both and decide which branch to keep working on based on the action or inaction of ...
John's user avatar
  • 364
10 votes
Accepted

Etiquette for an incorrect Pull Request

Your suggested sentence is fine. If you want, you can also thank the other person for spotting your mistake and explain why you were mistaken. If you made the mistake, others might as well - after ...
Heinzi's user avatar
  • 566
8 votes
Accepted

Etiquette around forks & npm

If your PRs aren't being accepted, the best course of action is to published a scoped version of the package. You can do this even before you think that your PR is being ignored. If you make ...
curiousdannii's user avatar
8 votes

Etiquette for an incorrect Pull Request

"Oops, I was mistaken, sorry! Thanks for your time."
ScottishTapWater's user avatar
7 votes

Starting (not forking) a new project based on a seemingly dead one

When the original owner has abandoned their project, they might be quite glad about someone wanting to take over. You definitely have nothing to lose by trying to contact them. Taking over the name ...
Philipp's user avatar
  • 12k
7 votes

I accidentally left a crude, personally-insulting debug print line in a public pull request

Different projects have different etiquette and different social contracts, so YMMV. Personally, I'd comment on the PR and apologize with something down the lines of "the previous version of this ...
Mureinik's user avatar
  • 5,142
7 votes

Does tracking users violate open source license?

It doesn't violate normal free software licences, and it's not unheard of. The email client alpine, released under Apache v2, on first invocation (and, if memory serves, after major upgrades) ...
MadHatter's user avatar
  • 49.6k
7 votes

I was told by a project that they only want my help on a few things

Normally, help is very welcome. But every project has its own culture. Sometimes it's spelled out explicitly as a “Contributing” guide, sometimes it's implicit and you'd have to learn by lurking. It ...
amon's user avatar
  • 39.1k
6 votes

How should I continue work on an abandoned open source project?

Forking implies a few things which may answer your question. First, the original author - by using a free/libre license - authorized you to fork, for whatever reason. You cannot "steal" something ...
grin's user avatar
  • 314
6 votes

Visual Studio compatibility of Open Source project

The harsh-reality answer: You are the project maintainer. Contributors may not like it, but technically, you can reject PRs for any prosaic reason. "My ability to open the project is a requirement" ...
Mureinik's user avatar
  • 5,142
5 votes

I was told by a project that they only want my help on a few things

I really would like to continue helping this project. Is there any general rule of etiquette on GitHub or open source projects in general that I don't see? This is my first major project I helped with ...
Xiong Chiamiov's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Guidelines for licensing and attribution for code from an article/blog post

So you want to distribute parts from an article which has no license. If the parts are eligible for copyright protection : You are not allowed to distribute these parts at all. If the parts are not ...
unor's user avatar
  • 5,670
5 votes
Accepted

What is the proper etiquette for modifying a repo, then publishing it for an unrelated use?

First rule, do not fork. Forking is only used on GitHub to contribute changes back (which shouldn't be the case for you). You can, at your preference, decide to clone the repo and keep the history, ...
Zimm i48's user avatar
  • 5,597
5 votes
Accepted

How long to wait until the contributors will make a PR

Putting together a PR may take time, especially if this is the first time someone contributes to this project (or to open source at all, for that matter!). I'd give a grace period of at least a week ...
Mureinik's user avatar
  • 5,142
4 votes

Is it acceptable to change the implementation language in a pull request?

is it acceptable to change the implementation language via pull request? Everything is "acceptable" for you to propose... but not everything may be accepted. If you were to submit a PR to one of my ...
Philippe Ombredanne's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

How to release code that depends on an unmerged branch

In order for your release to remain stable, you're going to need to fork that unmerged branch yourself. Otherwise, that branch may disappear, rendering your package unusable. As you mentioned in the ...
RubberDuck's user avatar
  • 5,466
4 votes

Maintainer ignores PRs but spends a lot of time on Stack Overflow

Yes, it is reasonable, but it will be most reasonable if you create yourself the patches for the docs / wiki. So, don't just go around suggesting things to be improved. Improve them on your own, and ...
juhist's user avatar
  • 279
3 votes
Accepted

Need feature in PR with failing checks

To resolve this problem you can fork the version that includes a feature that you need and resolve the check problem. After that you can submit the PR with your changes. An example: There exist a ...
vincenzopalazzo's user avatar
3 votes

How to send a merge request for a new unit test that fails?

Depending on the programming language you are using you can creatge a mergerequest with a disabled/ignored unittest. This avoid having failing-unit-tests in the code branch which can be easyly ...
k3b's user avatar
  • 133
2 votes

When forking an open-source project, what should I do with the maintainers' emails included in the source code?

Ask them Instead of guessing, just ask the people on the list what they want. Send them an email stating you forked the project, and ask them how they want to be listed: Name + email address Name ...
Abigail's user avatar
  • 121
2 votes

I accidentally left a crude, personally-insulting debug print line in a public pull request

Nothing. Just remove it. If anyone complains about it, just say you've removed it now.
Quitting Due To Antisemitism's user avatar
2 votes

Visual Studio compatibility of Open Source project

If it's your project, you should make sure it actually works. Whilst you can't check that some proposed change works (and doesn't introduce anything malicious), you should only pull it if you know the ...
leftaroundabout's user avatar
2 votes

I was told by a project that they only want my help on a few things

To add to @amon's answer - another consideration may be the timing. Some projects use strict development cycles (or sprints). For example, a certain development sprint may concentrate only on ...
Mureinik's user avatar
  • 5,142
1 vote

Is there any general open source etiquette, or is it specific to each project?

Different communities have different standards and different etiquette, but there are some shared notions that apply to most communities. First, do your homework. Most projects document what they ...
Mureinik's user avatar
  • 5,142

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible