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101 votes
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Is it wrong to demand features in open-source projects?

Suppose that I tell you that I require you to cease posting here, immediately come round to my house, and cook me lunch. Your first response might, very reasonably, be "who on earth is this ...
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49 votes

Is it wrong to demand features in open-source projects?

I'm not a native English speaker but to me "demanding" implies having authority. A policeman can demand that you show your hands; a teacher can demand that the students be quiet. A parent ...
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18 votes

Is it wrong to demand features in open-source projects?

It's not wrong to ask for features in open-source projects. Preferably in a gentle and well-educated manner. Of course, the people maintaining it are under no obligation to fulfill that. Quite often, ...
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16 votes
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How do I deal with authorship after a fork?

You have forked a GPLv2 package, and created a derivative work therefrom. You are curious about the licensing and copyright arrangements for the new work. Fortunately, neither of these are in any ...
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16 votes

Is it wrong to demand features in open-source projects?

Let's refocus the question to address the security aspect of https://github.com/echojs/echojs/issues/12 (other great answers already address the tone of demanding a fix and calling for a volunteer ...
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15 votes

Encouraging a piece of software to be used ethically

No - because then it wouldn't be open source. The Open Source Initiative defines one of its essential freedoms as: 6. No Discrimination Against Fields of Endeavor The license must not restrict ...
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  • 2,100
10 votes
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Is it ethical to release free, zero-cost software if it will destroy the competitive market?

Consider, for a moment, a camp for the "re-education" of political prisoners, otherwise-innocent critics of the current repressive regime. A revolution happens, an enlightened regime comes ...
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10 votes

Is it wrong to demand features in open-source projects?

Yes, it is wrong to demand anything of open source projects. Open Source developers tend to first and foremost implement features or work on bugs that are relevant to themselves; and secondarily they ...
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  • 311
6 votes

Can I prevent the National Security Agency from using my work?

No you cannot. Copyright does not regulate use of information Criminals and state actors operate under different rules. There are different kinds of “IP”. Copyright is well-known, but does not cover ...
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6 votes

Is it wrong to demand features in open-source projects?

I'm not sure you (for whom English is presumably a second language) understand what the word "demand" means: to ask or call for with authority : claim as due or just If, however, English ...
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  • 169
6 votes
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Why is Android frequently taunted as “evil” in the FOSS community?

The objections to Android are basically the same as the objections to any other distribution that is not fully free. If you see complaints more frequently or intensely about Android, this is probably ...
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5 votes
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Open Source Textbook Solutions

Problems in textbooks are often used in homework or exams. That is the most often cited reason. Besides, having the answers gives the lecturer a (not to be dismissed) advantage in front of the class. ...
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5 votes

License that is safe against terrorist groups

The Open Source Definition requires: No Discrimination Against Persons or Groups The license must not discriminate against any person or group of persons. No Discrimination Against Fields ...
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4 votes
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Ethical Open Source Protection

That's what the big shouty all-caps warranty disclaimer, that many people seem to dislike, is doing. Here's an example from the MIT license: THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ...
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  • 8,463
3 votes

Is it wrong to demand features in open-source projects?

Is it wrong? Who knows - that depends very much on personal position. Is it helpful? I'd argue not. If you're not writing the code yourself, you need to persuade someone else that they want to make ...
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3 votes

False Claims and Open Source

How can I make sure that the extensions I use are open source and they use the code that they claim to be? Short answer: you can't. Long answer: To check if the source code and the binary belong ...
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  • 131
2 votes

How to respect user freedom when selling consumer software without services?

One of the central objectives of FLOSS is to place all recipients on roughly equal footing as the original author, as far as legal rights to modify and sell the software are concerned. As you've ...
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  • 30.9k
2 votes

Can I prevent the National Security Agency from using my work?

Short answer Can you do this? Yes Will they abide by it? Quite possibly not Is it still worth doing? Maybe Long answer As someone who cares about a fair and just society, it's important to remember ...
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  • 121
2 votes

Is it wrong to demand features in open-source projects?

So, is it wrong to demand changes in open-source projects? Yes, it is wrong. The maintainer(s) of the project don't owe you anything. They are under no obligation to do what you want. Consider this ...
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2 votes

How can a repository host comply with a foreign takedown order ethically?

I'm going to assume that your ethical criteria are the same as the FSF's. I observe in passing that the FSF is not just focussed on traditionally-repressive regimes; one of the two C2-class failures ...
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1 vote

False Claims and Open Source

To complement other answers: That it is open source doesn't mean that it will be continuously updated, or at all. The owner of the code can also take e.g. version 2.5 and state that from the following ...
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