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15

No - because then it wouldn't be open source. The Open Source Initiative defines one of its essential freedoms as: 6. No Discrimination Against Fields of Endeavor The license must not restrict anyone from making use of the program in a specific field of endeavor. For example, it may not restrict the program from being used in a business, or from being ...


6

The Open Source Definition requires: No Discrimination Against Persons or Groups The license must not discriminate against any person or group of persons. No Discrimination Against Fields of Endeavor The license must not restrict anyone from making use of the program in a specific field of endeavor. For example, it may not restrict the ...


4

The objections to Android are basically the same as the objections to any other distribution that is not fully free. If you see complaints more frequently or intensely about Android, this is probably due to its position as a de facto default operating system for virtually all mobile devices that are not manufactured by Apple. That is, Android's prominence ...


4

That's what the big shouty all-caps warranty disclaimer, that many people seem to dislike, is doing. Here's an example from the MIT license: THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT ...


4

Problems in textbooks are often used in homework or exams. That is the most often cited reason. Besides, having the answers gives the lecturer a (not to be dismissed) advantage in front of the class. The problems themselves are copyrighted material, whatever you write up as solutions is unambiguously based on them. If this is enough to make it a "derivative ...


2

I'm going to assume that your ethical criteria are the same as the FSF's. I observe in passing that the FSF is not just focussed on traditionally-repressive regimes; one of the two C2-class failures in GitHub's report relates to US export controls. As has been noted, GNU Savannah seems to deal with this by not hosting projects that might run foul of US ...


1

How can I make sure that the extensions I use are open source and they use the code that they claim to be? Short answer: you can't. Long answer: To check if the source code and the binary belong together, reproducible builds (see https://reproducible-builds.org/) would be necessary. Usually, everyone who compiles the source code will get another result. ...


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