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You are writing the software under contract with the company, so the rights aren't yours to begin with...


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Is there a license that protects me in case they reuse my source code to build a new application and I no longer get 8%? By accepted definition on https://opensource.org/licenses such a license won't be open source (or free software, e.g. GPLv3+ software). I am not a lawyer. You need to pay one. Read a paper on Simple Economics of open source (one of ...


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If you got the software with no discernible copyright notice, you got it in violation of the license. See if you can get it upstream, or contact the original author(s) to see how to fix the violation.


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Who is the copyright holder is governed by copyright law, not the license (the license works in the frame of the law). If you put "Authored by Marvin the Martian" in your code, that doesn't change the fact that you wrote it, and you own it. And in some jurisdictions (e.g. Germany) the copyright protections last for 70 years after the dead of the author or (...


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As far as I understand (IANAL, IANYL, I don't impersonate one on SE either), the MIT license doesn't allow "... even though you legally claimed ownership of the code (as explicitly permitted by the MIT license),..." First, the owner of the code is the author(s) (or, if written under contract for somebody else, who hired them). They can transfer their rights ...


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No need to do so, whoever gets the code form you can do as they please under the license you grant. And the MIT license is very generous, it places almost no restrictions on whoever gets the code.


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Open source licenses operate under copyright law, which governs permission to do certain things with the "creative work" under consideration. It covers permission to use, to modify, and to copy (get it yourself and pass it to somebody else). Open source is about allowing: Free distribution: Can pass it to whomever you want. Source code is available: So you ...


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As far as I understand, the copyright holder to the file (there might be several) should add a line "Copyright 2020 John Smith. Licensed under conditions" to it somewhere. If no explicit permissions, nobody has any right on the file's contents. Not read it, not change it, not pass a copy to somebody else. If somebody makes a (substantial) change, add their ...


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