49

You've noticed that if a piece of software is "free as in speech," it will probably become "free as in beer" too. That's completely true. The important thing, however, is that the converse is not true. If a piece of software is "free as in beer," it will not automatically become "free as in speech." There are a lot of ...


7

This is why most Open Source vendors sell service plans rather than software. Yes, the nature of Open Source licenses would allow anyone to download and install the software for free, and to in turn give free copies of the software to other people. As a result, most Open Source vendors don't sell the software itself - they sell service plans. You can install ...


4

You are broadly correct that if your program includes CC BY-SA code from someone else, you must license the entire program under CC BY-SA. Note that this doesn't actually force source disclosure -- unlike the GPL, you may place your binary only under CC BY-SA, and keep your source code private -- but it would require unrestricted downstream redistribution of ...


4

Actually I think this rule is coming from the ages before internet was available for everyone. Like 35 years ago you could buy a few floppy disks with linux on it. And that the vendor could charge you was only legal because it was 'free as in speech' and not 'as in beer'. At that time copying software was not effortless.


2

While someone who had bought a piece of copyleft software only distributed by the author for paying customers could indeed redistribute it for free, it doesn't necessarily follow that someone would. Even if the software is copyleft, the party developing and selling that software can ask their clients (more or less) nicely to please not redistribute it. If ...


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