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CC BY-ND 4.0 says in section 2(a)(4): Media and formats; technical modifications allowed. The Licensor authorizes You to exercise the Licensed Rights in all media and formats whether now known or hereafter created, and to make technical modifications necessary to do so. The Licensor waives and/or agrees not to assert any right or authority to forbid You ...


10

No, CC-BY-ND isn't Open Source. It violates rule 3 of the Open Source Definition: Derived Works The license must allow modifications and derived works, and must allow them to be distributed under the same terms as the license of the original software. It also violates the freedom 3 of the Free Software Definition: The freedom to ...


8

No. Any modifications you apply that aren't sanctioned by the owner are classed as derivative works. Your result still contains the author's material, true, but you've changed the way it's presented - it's like removing some code that's just a wrapper for a routine. You're changing the product, which creates a derivative work, which is disallowed. tl;dr: No ...


4

Note that the license still says you may... not Share[] Adapted Material Insofar as your isolated part is Adapted Material of the original, it is forbidden to share. If your isolated part is not Adapted Material, then it is allowed to be shared. Looking at one of the final drafts of CC BY-ND 4.0 (which is not legally binding, but may help understand ...


4

Creative Commons does not recommend applying their licenses to software. You seem like you might know this already, but it's worth linking again. if some platform decides "for some obscure legal reason, GPL software is not allowed" What makes you worry about the GPL specifically? What is there to say that the platform will say "CC-BY-ND is not allowed", ...


4

The CC BY-ND is not compatible with either the OSI's Open Source definition or the FSF's Free Software Definition. That said, the FSF still considers it to have an appropriate use that is compatible with their movement: to licence opinions and testimonies. The licence shouldn't be used for documentation or project assets, but they do consider it to be ...


3

Yes there is. The copyright license does not allow you to make any changes.


3

The FSF lists the CC BY-ND license under a different category: Licenses for Works stating a Viewpoint (e.g., Opinion or Testimony) The introduction says (bold emphasis mine): Because of this, we expect them to provide recipients with a different set of permissions: just the permission to copy and distribute the work verbatim. So it’s not a license that ...


3

This is not legal advice. You shouldn't be trusting legal interpretations from an unqualified, Canadian secondary school student. I advise you to seek professional advice from a qualified person. The question you've asked here, is whether programmatically looping a song results in a derivative. The question at stake is a general one: when does manipulating ...


1

The way I'd read this is that the answer to all three of your questions is: yes. From the FAQ answer you quoted: Once a CC license is applied to a work in one format or medium, a licensee may use the same work in any other format or medium ... As you correctly stated, you can't omit parts of a work under an ND license. So as long as everything is intact,...


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