6

Most of the binary blobs in Linux are in device drivers, and most of those are in WiFi drivers. Their function is to be the operating code for the hardware on the device; unless they're loaded when the hardware is initialised, the hardware will not function. It is unfortunate that WiFi manufacturers, in particular, have chosen this method of operation; but ...


5

As long as the binary is under an open source license, you would have rights to disassemble it and distribute the results (optionally modified). However, with a permissive license like BSD or MIT/X11, people who use your work have no obligation to license their modifications under that same license. With a copyleft license like the GPL, people can distribute ...


3

Does the fact that I sign and distribute runtime & SDK used to write the component oblige me to change the component's license to MIT / Apache2? No, software under Apache 2 or MIT/Expat/X11 licenses may be used within software under virtually any license. These are "permissive" licenses which means they don't impose many requirements (other ...


2

The binaries are derivative of the source, so if you choose to distribute them, you must do so under the terms of the CC BY-NC-SA. If you choose to publish source code that is derivative of CC BY-NC-SA, your code must be distributed under that same license. However, there is no requirement that you publish your modifications in source form, even when ...


2

Copyright law is interesting because it's at the boundary of criminal and civil law. But in this case, the criminal side can be safely ignored. Criminal prosecution has a higher standard of evidence, and this case is murky enough that there is insufficient public interest for the State to press charges. This leaves us with the civil side, as apsillers ...


2

If you're shipping the dependencies, then you must fulfil their license terms, such as including the license notices with your software. How to do this properly depends on the context of your software. E.g. the license notices might be included in documentation files like Python does, or a software with a GUI might show them in an info panel like most web ...


1

Any old open source license allows doing this as long as you get the binary under that license (i.e., not e.g. a BSD package modified and distributed under a closed license). But it is quite nonsensical to go screwing around with the binary if source is available (even if it is assembly or a similar low-lewel representation).


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