10 votes
Accepted

Are there good reasons to open source "trivial" projects?

Open sourcing a project is never evil. You can open source small scripts to full scale applications if you want, and be assured that among the millions of programmers out there, even if it is useful ...
user avatar
  • 623
5 votes
Accepted

What are the good reasons for my company to offer open source code?

Making your code open source is not always a good solution. It is completely understandable if your company doesn't want to do that. For example: There are legal considerations. Which license do you ...
user avatar
  • 33.2k
4 votes
Accepted

Arguments for using a FLOSS license

I have written a book on how I created a multi-million-dollar business with open source software. I was the original developer of the FOSS PDF library iText that was available under the MPL/LGPL for 8 ...
user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Compelling reasons to open-source internal service of a highly recognized brand by just dumping the sources?

The "minimum requirements" for open sourcing some code depend primarily on why your company plans to publish it, and secondarily on what it is. First, sometimes this kind of "code dump" actually ...
user avatar
3 votes

Getting a company to start discussing open source

Here's my advice to you as a low-level developer who wants the company to contribute more to OSS: you need to influence by example. Because you have no opportunity to discuss community policy in a ...
user avatar
3 votes

What benefits would there be *for me* to freely license the code of my project but not the assets?

Commercial projects often do this when the assets are the valuable parts. Games are a good example: often what makes a game worth purchasing is not the engine, but the level design, the graphics, etc. ...
user avatar
3 votes

What are the good reasons for my company to offer open source code?

You won't win this argument because people think there is more value in the sourcecode than there really is. They assume... - that because they paid you a lot of money to create it, others can run ...
user avatar
2 votes

What are the good reasons for my company to offer open source code?

I have proposed exactly the same in the company I work for. I specifically listed non-business-critical code in the request. I failed. The justification they gave was that if the project becomes ...
user avatar
  • 269
2 votes

Free or non-free distribution, what is the question?

I often read that some distributions contain non-free components while some other are free. As an end-user, I don't understand very well the difference between free and non-free distributions. ...
user avatar
2 votes

What benefits would there be *for me* to freely license the code of my project but not the assets?

Benefits of open-sourcing the code are the same as those of any other open source project. The primary benefit to you is your contribution to the open source and programming communities: you have ...
user avatar
  • 8,700
1 vote

What are the good reasons for my company to offer open source code?

Something I learned from the FOSS-Backstage 2018 in Berlin is this: Open source projects can have a governance process which makes decisions transparent and includes new-comers. (Two among other) ...
user avatar
  • 289
1 vote

What benefits would there be *for me* to freely license the code of my project but not the assets?

Generally open-source MMOs follow this model, they keep the assets as their own (because of the considerable amount of work involved) and release the code freely, this way they keep control of the ...
user avatar
  • 181

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible