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1

Many of the answers have looked at this topic overwhelmingly from the perspective of what is legal or illegal. Obviously this is valuable and is what matters in the end, but I think that approaching this from an ethical standpoint might be helpful, even to come to a legal conclusion. For use of an unmodified AGPL (or GPL for that matter) library, you need ...


3

After careful thought, I find I cannot agree with my colleague's answer. It is certainly true, as you show, that the GPL FAQ says that AGPLv3 s13 doesn't apply if "a program is not expressly designed to interact with a user through a network, but is [merely] being run in an environment where it happens to do so". My problem is that s13 doesn't ...


1

That users can technically use the program over the network means little, since the program is not designed as such. Yes. If we can believe the GPL FAQ, then if the program itself is not aware that the user is on the other end of a network connection, clause 13 of the AGPL does not trigger and you are not required to offer the source code based on that ...


0

I think it is very unlikely such a license would have any legal traction. Copyright, on which software licenses are based, has mostly to do with copying/distributing the work, internal use is not distribution. And nobody in their right mind would license that way, just to get subjected to the firehose of "I changed line 427 to see if...", "...


5

Different licensors have different intensions. But licensors issuing Open Source licenses are generally trying to maximize Software Freedom. Copyleft licenses try to maximize Software Freedom by ensuring that every recipient or user of the software has full rights e.g. to share this software further and to modify it. Modification requires access to the ...


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