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I would like to know, under what license is the content of GitHub issues that were created by others.

To clarify my needs:

  • By "issues created by others", I mean issues created by GitHub users both in their own repositories and in the repositories of others.
  • By "content", I mean all content that GitHub allows one to put into an issue – source code, images, poems, personal thoughts, etc.

What I have discovered so far

  1. GitHub's Terms of Service explicitly mention issues only in one place – in the point D.5 (they are mentioned as a part of so-called "User-Generated Content"), but there is only one indication of things interesting for me: that other GitHub users may view issues.

  2. I have tried to find indications of license (or just rights and obligations) for "User-Generated Content" in the Terms, but I could not find anything more specific than in the point D.5, according to my needs.

  3. In the point D.6, the Terms state:

    Whenever you make a contribution to a repository containing notice of a license, you license your contribution under the same terms, and you agree that you have the right to license your contribution under those terms.

    I suspect that the mentioned "contribution" might include issues, but I am not sure whether it is so.

  • 2
    What concrete thing are you asking about? For example, suppose you attach a photograph (that you created yourself) into a GitHub issue of someone else's repository, without stating a license for use of your photograph; are you asking under what license that photograph is published? – Brandin Nov 5 at 7:28
  • @Brandin Yes, that is an example of what I am asking. Maybe I should have used the word "license". – Silv Nov 5 at 22:22
  • Yes I mean if you ask a specifc case like this it might be easier to answer this. Right now "what rights and obligations do I have" is kind of open ended. – Brandin Nov 5 at 22:26
  • @Brandin I have changed the title, and slightly the body. – Silv Nov 5 at 22:35
  • @MadHatter I generally consider my questions written in the most appropriate way (that I want to express them), but anyway, thanks for editing. Maybe it is now indeed clearer. – Silv Nov 6 at 15:14

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