9

Two famous programs by Google are:

  • Code-in for pre-university students
  • Summer of Code for students currently enrolled in a university

Both of these programs take a limited number of students and many students who do want to get involved and can get involved miss out due to the lack of relevant information.

Yet another program I know of is KDE's Season (During October-January).

What are some other similar programs for students to get started? In what ways can students get involved in Open Source?

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    This question is too broad because it can get dozens of equally valid and equally good answers. There is no way to differentiate those answers except by popularity. – Bart van Ingen Schenau Jul 3 '15 at 12:10
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    possible duplicate of What are the best ways to get involved with open source projects? – Philipp Jul 3 '15 at 14:28
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    @Philipp This wouldn't be a duplicate, the situations are highly different, and this is much more specific. Aside from that, the question looks fine to me. It doesn't look broad at all. I'm leaving it open. – Zizouz212 Jul 3 '15 at 14:49
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    I still don't understand where this question would be relevant, if not here. So many close votes. – Ranveer Jul 3 '15 at 16:24
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    List questions are not automatically too broad. Discussion on meta about this question – trichoplax Jul 5 '15 at 13:18
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My recommendation is to join the development and commit-notification mailing lists for an Open Source project you have an interest in, subscribe to notifications on GitHub if applicable, join their IRC channels, if applicable. Become very familiar with using the application and offer assistance to new users attempting to use the product and/or experiencing issues with it. Carefully review the project's bug-tracker and look for issues people are experiencing and proposals for new functionality. Watch commit notifications and observe how the project changes over time, how new features are developed, as well as feedback and revisions to patches and commits. Step one is to observe and learn, and this is critical. You should know a bit about what's going on before you just jump in. Ask questions, but be careful with assumptions. Read through the code comprehensively.

After a period of learning, it's time to begin contributing. Find a small issue you're capable of fixing, and submit a patch or pull request. Learn from the feedback you receive and avoid being defensive about your code. Follow the style and guidelines of the project. Engage in discussion on the development mailing lists, IRC, and bug trackers. As time goes on, you can begin working on bigger projects and more complex functionality. These communities are an easy place to gain respect and "move up the ladder" if you are a helpful contributor to the community, and behave in a respectful and respectable manner in the community.

Politics differ for each project, but it is often important to be politically-sensitive and aware. Much like a project at a for-profit company, sometimes politics are unavoidable.

You can also contribute without actually writing code--improving documentation can be a good place to start! This is just my perspective from my contributions to the Open Source community (including acting as maintainer of a small-but-active OSS project with many community members several years back), and I welcome others to share theirs as well :)

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    Welcome to Open Source! Thank you for posting such an amazing, comprehensive answer! :) – Zizouz212 Jul 6 '15 at 23:19
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    Thanks :) I'm glad this community exists. I'll try to contribute as much as I can! – Will Jul 6 '15 at 23:52
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I would highly recommend http://www.firsttimersonly.com/

It's dedicated to helping people who have never contributed to open source before contribute.

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One great way for students to get involved in coding is through a program called:

Hour of Code.

This is a FREE online course that allows students to enter into the world of coding. It has video tutorials and examples, to teach you the techniques you need. After you watch a video you can then try the process yourself with a helpful ui.

Some other examples of online coding websites include:

http://www.codecademy.com/ https://code.org/learn https://www.codeavengers.com/

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    This answer provides ways of learning coding, but does not appear to provide a way for students to specifically get involved in an open source project. – trichoplax Jul 4 '15 at 15:34

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