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I'm going to publish a software, which tests are written with googletest framework. I've read the googletest license, but I'm not going to publish the source code or any modifications of it, or compiled binaries from it, just the test code.

I'm just using parts of googletest on my own and publish the test code so everyone can use these parts in the same way. What does my license have to consider?

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  • The license only appears to apply if you redistribute the software (Google Test). Since you are not redistributing, what are you planning to do that could possibly be a violation of the license? – Brandin Nov 14 '17 at 12:50
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Google Test is released under the 3-clause BSD license, which is a permissive license that does not try to impose any license restrictions on projects that use it.

As your project is using Google Test and not modifying it in any way, you are completely free in your choice of license.

  • Attribution is still a restriction. It's not public domain. But that's only if you do distribute the project. Maybe change to "that use it but don't distribute it"? – curiousdannii Nov 13 '17 at 16:34
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    @curiousdannii: Updated my answer to make it clear I meant restrictions on the license that a project can use. – Bart van Ingen Schenau Nov 13 '17 at 17:23

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