2

In this project, the README says:

Code(if not stated differently):

(c) Copyright 2015-2016 DeveloperOne; modified zlib-License see "LICENSE.txt" for details.

And zlib license says:

This software is provided 'as-is', without any express or implied warranty. In no event will the authors be held liable for any damages arising from the use of this software.

Permission is granted to anyone to use this software for any purpose, including commercial applications, and to alter it and redistribute it freely, subject to the following restrictions:

  1. The origin of this software must not be misrepresented; you must not claim that you wrote the original software. If you use this software in a product, an acknowledgment in the product documentation is required.

  2. Altered source versions must be plainly marked as such, and must not be misrepresented as being the original software.

  3. This notice may not be removed or altered from any source distribution.


Can I relicense the new code under another license if I maintain the actual notice plus the new notice?

Ex:

Copyright (c) 2015-2016 DeveloperOne (modified zlib-license for code, if not stated differently)

Copyright (c) 2017 DeveloperTwo (new license for code)

zlib notice

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad...

new license notice

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad...

0

Yes, you can relicense this software. The LICENSE.txt file in the repository you link to is the notice referred to. You can modify this file to add your own copyright statement and your own license statement, as long as you preserve the current contents. Indeed, by doing so, you would be respecting all the conditions of the license.

0

This notice may not be removed or altered from any source distribution.

Pretty sure that 'notice' in this context refers to the License.

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