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It has always bothered me that the MIT license uses the word “conditions” but only seems to list one condition:

Permission is hereby granted […] to any person obtaining a copy of this software […] to deal in the Software without restriction […] subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND […]

(Emphasis mine.) Is the last paragraph considered to be a condition pertaining to the granting of permission? If not, why isn’t the singular “condition” used instead?

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(Emphasis mine.) Is the last paragraph considered to be a condition pertaining to the granting of permission? If not, why isn’t the singular “condition” used instead?

The last paragraph is a warranty disclaimer. Singular vs. plural in condition does not matter whether or not you consider this disclaimer as a condition or not.

FWIW a few MIT variants also float around using condition rather than conditions. And IMHO no sane lawyer or judge would consider the plural vs singular here as having any significance.

Use the MIT and be happy!

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There is an additional condition below the warranty clause in the X11 license , so I think that the SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS" is also interpreted as a condition.

Note: according wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MIT_License there are many MIT licenses, so it also could be a copy past error, on deriving the most famous MIT license (Expact License) from other MIT licenses.

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