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I'm making a game and want to properly license it, but I don't know how handle these licenses.

For example I license the source code under BSD-3.0 and the artwork under CC BY 4.0. This project depends on author A's library-X (licensed under Apache 2.0) to properly work, and one of the picture in this project (picture-Y.jpg) is downloaded from the internet, created by author B long time ago, licensed under CC BY 2.0.

I license and credit them by adding two text file license.txt and credits.txt in my project directory.

Contents of license.txt:

The source code of <My Game> is licensed under:

The 3-Clause BSD License

Copyright 2022 <My Name>

Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions are met:

1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.

2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.

3. Neither the name of the copyright holder nor the names of its contributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software without specific prior written permission.

THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT HOLDER OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.



The documentation and artwork of <My Game> is licensed under:

CC BY 4.0

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, PO Box 1866, Mountain View, CA 94042, USA.

Contents of credits.txt:

The <Library X> is created by <Author A>, licensed under:

Apache License
Version 2.0, January 2004
http://www.apache.org/licenses/ 

Copyright 201X <Author A>

Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License");
you may not use this file except in compliance with the License.
You may obtain a copy of the License at

    http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0

Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software
distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS,
WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied.
See the License for the specific language governing permissions and
limitations under the License.


The <"Picture Y.jpg"> is created by <Author B>, licensed under:

CC BY 2.0

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, PO Box 1866, Mountain View, CA 94042, USA.

Is this game project properly licensed? If not, How to correct it?

1 Answer 1

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To a large extent, your project seems to be properly licensed, but I do have some remarks/improvements:

  1. The CC BY 2.0 image does not only need to have credits in your repository, but also in your game itself in a format that is accessible to players of your game.
  2. It is good to clearly add an indication to your license.txt file that there are differently licensed 3-rd party parts and that people should look look at the credits.txt file to learn about those parts and their licenses.
  3. You should have a copy of the applicable license and a copyright line in each source file you created/modified to ensure the information doesn't get lost when the file gets separated from the rest of your repository.
  4. The same goes for your artwork, where you can add the information in the metadata of the files.

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