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I want to include all source codes in javax.naming.directory package of OpenJDK and use them. The files have comments such as below.

/*
 * Copyright (c) 1999, 2013, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.
 * DO NOT ALTER OR REMOVE COPYRIGHT NOTICES OR THIS FILE HEADER.
 *
 * This code is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it
 * under the terms of the GNU General Public License version 2 only, as
 * published by the Free Software Foundation.  Oracle designates this
 * particular file as subject to the "Classpath" exception as provided
 * by Oracle in the LICENSE file that accompanied this code.
 *
 * This code is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT
 * ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or
 * FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the GNU General Public License
 * version 2 for more details (a copy is included in the LICENSE file that
 * accompanied this code).
 *
 * You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License version
 * 2 along with this work; if not, write to the Free Software Foundation,
 * Inc., 51 Franklin St, Fifth Floor, Boston, MA 02110-1301 USA.
 *
 * Please contact Oracle, 500 Oracle Parkway, Redwood Shores, CA 94065 USA
 * or visit www.oracle.com if you need additional information or have any
 * questions.
 */

When I use them(not jar, but java files), should I disclose my application?

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    Please consider using search on this website. There are loads of questions already answered, for example here or here. After reading that please be specific about the remaining open questions. Dec 17, 2021 at 9:29
  • 2
    Short answer is: Yes. If you want to include OpenJDK source code in your product's codebase, then you must conform to the requirements of the GPL v2. That includes making the source code of your product available to people that you distribute your binaries to. The "classpath exception" does not apply to what you are proposing to do.
    – Stephen C
    Dec 17, 2021 at 14:48

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